William Burt Pope

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William Burt Pope (1822 – 1903) was an English Christian theologian in the Methodist tradition.

Life[edit]

He was born at Horton, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1822. He was the younger son of John Pope, and younger brother of George Uglow Pope. After education at a village school at Hooe and at a secondary school at Saltash, near Plymouth, William spent a year in boyhood (1837-8) at Bedeque, Prince Edward Island, assisting an uncle, a shipbuilder and general merchant. He was accepted, in 1840, by the methodist synod of Cornwall as a candidate for the ministry, and entered the Methodist Theological Institution at Hoxton. In 1842, he began his active ministry at Kingsbridge, Devonshire.[1]

Ordained in 1842, Pope became a successful linguist and translator of German anti-rationalist critics. He taught at Didsbury Wesleyan College in Manchester, England from 1867 to 1886. His greatest work, Compendium of Christian Theology (1875-1876), set forth influential arguments for the "holiness doctrine of all Methodist systematic theology" and defended Methodist doctrine against its critics.

He died on 5 July 1903, and was buried in Abney Park Cemetery, London.[1]

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