William Cubitt (politician)

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This article is about the contractor. For the engineer, see William Cubitt.
William Cubitt MP

William Cubitt (1791 – 28 October 1863) was an English engineering contractor and Conservative Party politician.

Career[edit]

William was a partner in the building firm established by his elder brother, Thomas Cubitt, at Gray's Inn Road but in about 1827 the partnership was dissolved leaving William solely in charge of the business.[1] The reasons for the split are not clear. William could have been concerned about the high risks of speculative building, or it may have been that Thomas's style was too autocratic, and William wanted to be more involved in policy decisions.

William built Covent Garden completed in 1830[2] and Fishmongers' Hall completed in 1834.[3] He also built the portico and the original station buildings at Euston completed in 1837.[4] He was also responsible for the reclaiming and development of Cubitt Town in the Isle of Dogs completed in 1850.[5] He retired completely from the business in 1851.[6] In 1883 the business was acquired by Holland & Hannen, a leading competitor, and the combined business became known as Holland & Hannen and Cubitts and subsequently as Holland, Hannen & Cubitts.[7]

William also had a younger brother, Lewis, a leading designer of his day.[8]

William sat as a Member of Parliament (MP) for Andover from 1847 until 1861. He then resigned his seat on 23 July 1861 by accepting appointment as Steward of the Manor of Hempholme[9] so that he could contest a by-election for the City of London, which he lost. He was re-elected for Andover on 17 December 1862 and served until his death on 28 October 1863.[10]

William became active in the politics of the City of London. He was Sheriff of London and Middlesex in 1847, an Alderman of the City in 1851, represented the City on the Metropolitan Board of Works from 1856,[11] served as Lord Mayor of London in 1860–61 and was re-elected in 1861–62. He died in Andover aged 72.

Family[edit]

In 1814 he married Elizabeth Scarlett; they had a son and four daughters.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Holland & Hannen and Cubitts – The Inception and Development of a Great Building Firm, published 1920, Page 35
  2. ^ "Covent Garden Market', Survey of London: volume 36: Covent Garden (1970), pp. 129-150.". Retrieved 4 June 2012. 
  3. ^ "William Cubitt & Co". Scottish Architects. Retrieved 4 June 2012. 
  4. ^ Holland & Hannen and Cubitts – The Inception and Development of a Great Building Firm, published 1920, Page 41
  5. ^ Holland & Hannen and Cubitts – The Inception and Development of a Great Building Firm, published 1920, Page 45
  6. ^ Holland & Hannen and Cubitts – The Inception and Development of a Great Building Firm, published 1920, Page 37
  7. ^ Cubitts 1810 – 1975, published 1975
  8. ^ Architects and Architecture of London By Kenneth Allinson, Page 136 RIBA Enterprises, 2009
  9. ^ Department of Information Services (14 January 2010). "Appointments to the Chiltern Hundreds and Manor of Northstead Stewardships since 1850". House of Commons Library. Retrieved 13 August 2010. 
  10. ^ Who's Who of British Members of Parliament: Vol. I 1832–1885, edited by M. Stenton (Harvester Press 1976)
  11. ^ "Metropolitan Board of Works". Morning Post. 18 October 1856. p. 7. 
  12. ^ Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Ralph Etwall
Lord William Paget
Member of Parliament for Andover
1847–1861
With: Henry Beaumont Coles 1847–1857
Hon. Dudley Fortescue 1857–1861
Succeeded by
Hon. Dudley Fortescue
Henry Beaumont Coles
Preceded by
Hon. Dudley Fortescue
Henry Beaumont Coles
Member of Parliament for Andover
1862–1863
With: Hon. Dudley Fortescue
Succeeded by
Hon. Dudley Fortescue
William Humphery
Political offices
Preceded by
John Carter
Lord Mayor of London
1860–1862
Succeeded by
William Rose