William Devereux

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William Devereux
Spouse(s) Hawise de Lacy

Issue

Walter Devereux, Lord of Lyonshall
Robert Devereux
Noble family House of Normandy
Father William d'Évreux
Died after 1110

William Devereux was an Anglo-Norman nobleman living during the reigns of kings William I, William II, and Henry I of England. The Devereux, along with the Baskervilles and Pichards, were prominent knightly families along the Welsh marches at the beginning of the twelfth century, and linked to the Braose and Lacy lordships of the region.[1] William Devereux's descendants would later give rise to the Devereux family of Hereford, and the Devereux Viscounts of Hereford and Earls of Essex.

Career[edit]

William was the son of William d'Évreux by a second unnamed wife.[2][3] There are indications he fought at Hastings as he was rewarded with lands along the Welsh Marches in Herefordshire and Gloucester that he held in 1086.[4] Lyonshall Castle was constructed at the direction of his overlord, Roger de Lacy during the late 11th century. When de Lacy was exiled in 1095 the castle came under more direct control of the Devereux family, and eventually they became its chief lords.[5]

William Devereux was a benefactor of the Abbey at Gloucester (Church of St. Peter in Gloucester). In 1086 William the Conqueror issued a charter to the abbey confirming the land it possessed, and William Devereux was identified as giving 1 hide of land.[6] During the time of King William Rufus in 1096 he was identified as granting a hide in Herefordshire, and two tenths (duas decimas) from 'Leech and Hadrop'.[7] A list of donations to the abbey showed William Devereux giving one hide of land in Jerchenfeld, Westone, and tithes from Haythrop, in the time of Abbot Serlo (1072 to 1104).[8][9] Other sources indicate he confirmed the grant of a hide in Herefordshire to St. Peter’s Abbey at Gloucester in the tenth year of Henry I (1110).[10][11] During the time of Abbot William (1113 to 1130) a woman named Hawise, identified as the widow of William Devereux, appeared on a list of donations as giving the land called Hyde, and that Walter de Lacy had given this to her upon her marriage.[12] The gift of William Devereux of one hide of land to the abbey was confirmed again by King Stephen in 1138,[13] the Archbishop of Canterbury between 1139 to 1148,[14] and King Henry II about 1174.[15]

Family[edit]

William married Hawise de Lacy,[16] daughter of Walter de Lacy.[17] This marriage occurred after 1066 as her dowry included post-conquest land grants. They had issue:[a]

Domesday Landholdings[edit]

According to the Domesday Book, William Devereux held the following lands valued at about £16 in 1086 under the Tenant-in-chief Roger de Lacy:[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ It was common for families to place younger sons in the clergy during this period. The Hereford Cathedral Obituary Book identifies a priest/monk, Richard Devereux, that died on 15 May 1141. He probably is a third son of William or a younger grandson. (J.S. Barrow. Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066-1300: volume 8: Hereford. (Institute of Historical Research, 2002). Fn 170
  2. ^ A Gilbert Devereux was precentor of Rouen Cathedral, chaplain to Henry I and Stephen, and treasurer of Normandy before 1128. Gilbert's son was named Robert Devereux and also was chaplain to Henry I and Stephen, and treasurer of Normandy after 1128. These individuals may represent a son and grandson respectively of this Robert Devereux.
  3. ^ East Leach and Hatherop both reside in the Hundred of Brightwell’s Barrow. In subsequent legal cases, it appears that Hatherop was referred to as part of East Leach, and was inherited by the de Lechlade family based on the marriage of Hugh de Lechlade with Orenge, daughter of Roger Devereux and descendent of William Devereux. East Leach would pass down to a Walter Devereux of Lyonshall, whose widow Cecilia, contested the ownership of these estates. Although, Cecilia lost her suit (Curia Regis Roll, 13 John, Michaelmas Term, membrane 6), some of East Leach was in the hands of the Devereux family as late as 1302 (Calender of Patent Rolls. 24 June, 31 Edward I (1302), membrane 20d).
  4. ^ This small piece of land is the closest of the Devereux grants to the Abbey Dore, and may be the location of the 'Woods of Huggesleg' granted by William Devereux's descendant, Roger Devereux, to the Abbey at the time of his death as referenced in A Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds in the Public Record Office (London; Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1890) in volume 1, page 277, B.673.
  5. ^ The Chapel at Putley was granted to the canons of Hereford by William Devereux. Cecilia Devereux, widow of Walter Devereux of Lyonshall, would contest the ownership of this Chapel and lose when the Canons produced the original charter. The final accord was published in: Monasticon Anglicanum. by Sir William Dugdale, knight, Volume the 6th part III. London: Published for the Proprietors by James Bohn, 12, King William Street, Charing Cross. 1846, page 1217. Cecelia Devereux still held Putley in the Testa de Nevil in 1242.
  6. ^ Street Court (so named from its position on the old Roman road) was held under the Lady Cecily Devereux by Thomas de Street, in the reign of Edward I. Cecily was the widow of Walter Devereux of Lyonshall, great-great-grandson of William Devereux
  7. ^ These lands remained in Devereux hands as late as 1308 when their ownership was contested between the sons of Hugh Devereux (De Banco Roll, Easter, 2 Edward II, No. 176, r. 51, Hereford).
  8. ^ Part of the maund grants were held later as Whitechurch Maund by Baron John Devereux (died 1392/3). See reference 24 below.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brock W. Holden. Lords of the Central Marches. (Oxford; Oxford University Press, 2008). page 92
  2. ^ Catherine Lucy Wilhelmina Powlett Cleveland, Duchess of Cleveland, Battle Abbey Roll, with some account of the Norman Lines, Vol. 1 (London: John Murray, 1889), p. 325
  3. ^ M. Jackson Crispin and Leonce Macary. Falaise Roll. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1985). page 41
  4. ^ a b Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, William Devereux
  5. ^ Charles Robinson. A History of the Castles of Herefordshire and their Lords. page 125
  6. ^ William Henry Hart (editor). Historia et Cartularium Monaterii Sancti Petri Gloucestriae, Volume 1. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1863, Page 334
  7. ^ a b c d Charles Johnson and HA Cronne (editors). Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum, 1066-1154; Volume II Regesta Henrici Primi, 1100-1135. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1956. Page 410
  8. ^ William Henry Hart (editor). Historia et Cartularium Monasterii Sancti Petri Gloucesteriae, Volume 1. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1863, page 118
  9. ^ William Henry Hart (editor). Historia et Cartularium Monasterii Sancti Petri Gloucesteriae, Volume 2. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1863, page 40
  10. ^ Arthur Collins. The Peerage of England. (London: 1779). Volume VI, page 1, Devereux Viscount of Hereford
  11. ^ Roger Dodsworth. Monasticon Anglicanum by William Dugsdale. (London: 1673). Vol. 3, Cathedrals, page 187
  12. ^ William Henry Hart (editor). Historia et Cartularium Monasterii Sancti Petri Gloucesteriae, Volume 1. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1863. Page 88
  13. ^ William Henry Hart (editor). Historia et Cartularium Monasterii Sancti Petri Gloucesteriae, Volume 1. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1863. Page 223
  14. ^ William Henry Hart (editor). Historia et Cartularium Monasterii Sancti Petri Gloucesteriae, Volume 1. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1863. Page 226
  15. ^ William Henry Hart (editor). Historia et Cartularium Monasterii Sancti Petri Gloucesteriae, Volume 1. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1863. Page 350
  16. ^ a b Morgan G. Watkins. Collections Towards the History and Antiquities of the County of Hereford in continuation of Duncumb’s History, Hundred of Radlow. (High Town [Hereford]: Jakeman & Carver, 1902). Page 42 to 49. Parish of Castle Frome, Genealogy contributed by Lord Hereford
  17. ^ Robert William Eyton. Antiquities of Shropshire. (London: JR Smith, 1857). Pages 26-29
  18. ^ a b Brock W. Holden. Lords of the Central Marches. (Oxford; Oxford University Press, 2008). page 40
  19. ^ Catherine Lucy Wilhelmina Powlett Cleveland, Duchess of Cleveland, Battle Abbey Roll, with some account of the Norman Lines, Vol. 1 (London: John Murray, 1889), pp. 325–26 (citing Mont
  20. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18, 2012, Eastleach (Turville)
  21. ^ John Morris (editor). Domesday Books (Phillimore Editions). (Chichester: 1975-1992). Gloucester: Roger de Lacy, fief 39, entry 13.
  22. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, Hatherop
  23. ^ John Morris (editor). Domesday Books (Phillimore Editions). (Chichester: 1975-1992). Gloucester: Roger de Lacy, fief 39, entry 14.
  24. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, Ewyas (Harold)
  25. ^ John Morris (editor). Domesday Books (Phillimore Editions). (Chichester: 1975-1992). Hereford: Roger de Lacy, fief 10, entry 1.
  26. ^ a b F.W. Maitland (editor). Bracton’s Note Book. A Collection of Cases Decided in the King’s Courts During the Reign of Henry the Third, Annotated by a Lawyer of that Time, Seemingly by Henry of Bratton, Volume II. London: CJ Clay & Sons, 1887. Page 182, Case 227
  27. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, Putley
  28. ^ John Morris (editor). Domesday Books (Phillimore Editions). (Chichester: 1975-1992). Hereford: Roger de Lacy, fief 10, entry 4.
  29. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, Street
  30. ^ John Morris (editor). Domesday Books (Phillimore Editions). (Chichester: 1975-1992). Hereford: Roger de Lacy, fief 10, entry 41.
  31. ^ Charles Robinson. A History of the Mansions and Manors of Herefordshire. (London: Longmans and Company, 1872). page 159
  32. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, Grendon
  33. ^ John Morris (editor). Domesday Books (Phillimore Editions). (Chichester: 1975-1992). Hereford: Roger de Lacy, fief 10, entry 72.
  34. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, Elnodestune
  35. ^ John Morris (editor). Domesday Books (Phillimore Editions). (Chichester: 1975-1992). Hereford: Roger de Lacy, fief 10, entry 17.
  36. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, Maund (bryan)
  37. ^ a b John Morris (editor). Domesday Books (Phillimore Editions). (Chichester: 1975-1992). Hereford: Roger de Lacy, fief 10, entry 6.
  38. ^ Morgan G. Watkins. Collections Towards the History and Antiquities of the County of Hereford in continuation of Duncumb’s History, Hundred of Radlow. (High Town [Hereford]: Jakeman & Carver, 1902). Page 42 to 49. Parish of Castle Frome, Genealogy contributed by Lord Hereford
  39. ^ Anna Powell-Smith, Open Domesday, accessed March 18 2012, (Rose)maund