William Donald Schaefer Building

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William Donald Schaefer Building
William Donald Schaefer Building.jpg
The William Donald Schaefer Building is the third-tallest building in Baltimore.
General information
Location 6 Saint Paul Place, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Coordinates 39°17′23″N 76°36′51″W / 39.2898°N 76.6141°W / 39.2898; -76.6141Coordinates: 39°17′23″N 76°36′51″W / 39.2898°N 76.6141°W / 39.2898; -76.6141
Completed 1992
Opening 1992
Height
Antenna spire 590 ft (180 m)
Roof 493 ft (150 m)
Technical details
Floor count 37
Design and construction
Developer Maryland Department of General Services
References
[1][2]

The William Donald Schaefer Building, also known as the William Donald Schaefer Tower or simply the Donald Schaefer Building, is a skyscraper in Baltimore, Maryland. The building rises 37 floors and 493 feet (150 m) in height,[1] and stands as the third-tallest building in the city. If the flagpole atop the building, which reaches 590 feet, is included, the building would be the tallest in the state (flagpoles are normally not counted when determining architectural height).[3] The nine upper floors are unoccupied and contain a spiral staircase to the top floor.[3] The structure was completed in 1992.[2]

The William Donald Schaefer Building was named after William Donald Schaefer, who served as the mayor of Baltimore from 1971 until 1986.[1] Schaefer later served as the Governor of the state of Maryland from 1987 until 1995.[1]

The building began its life as the "Merritt Tower" after the Merritt Commercial Savings and Loan. This savings and loan association went bankrupt after a run on its deposits in 1985 and was partially responsible for the collapse of the Maryland Savings-Share Insurance Corporation, a quasi-public nonprofit corporation which guaranteed deposits in state chartered banks and thrifts.[4] The building was sold at auction for US$30 million.[3] After a succession of owners, the Maryland Department of General Services purchased the building from Chemical Bank of New York for US$12.2 million.[3]

Building characteristics[edit]

The upper floors were actually designed as a loft apartment with a huge palladian window overlooking the inner harbor. It was to be a "shag pad" for the developer's (the president of the bank) own personal and very private use. The floor in front of the window had been scheduled to have a hot tub installed there and the upper mezzanine style half floors on the left and right sides of the space were to be bed room areas for his personal entertainment. As of 2008 the final finished floor is a conference room of the Maryland Transit Administration.[5]

Tenants[edit]

The building houses several state agencies. It hosts headquarters of several agencies, including the Maryland Transit Administration,[6][7] the Board of Contract Appeals (Suite 601),[7][8] the Maryland Governor's Office of Minority Affairs (Suite 1502),[7][9] the Maryland Office of People's Counsel (Suite 2102),[7][10] the Maryland Commission on Civil Rights (Suite 900),[7][11] the Office of the Public Defender (Suite 1400),[7][12] the Maryland Public Service Commission (16th Floor),[7][13] and the Maryland Teachers & State Employees Supplemental Retirement Plans system (Suite 200).[7][14] It also houses branch offices of the Department of Assessments and Taxation, the Department of General Services, an office of the Governor of Maryland, the Governor's Office of Health Care Alternative Dispute Resolution, the Governor's Office of Homeland Security, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund, and the Property Tax Assessment Appeal Boards.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "William Donald Schaefer Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b "Donald Schaefer Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-24. 
  3. ^ a b c d Rosen, Andy (June 20, 2008). "What's atop the Schaefer Tower in Baltimore?". The Daily Record (Baltimore). Retrieved 2009-02-22. 
  4. ^ 'Brandenburg v. Seidel', 859 F.2d 1179, 1181 (4th Cir. 1988).
  5. ^ "What's atop the Schaefer Tower in Baltimore?" The Baltimore Daily Record. June 20, 2008. Retrieved on September 18, 2012.
  6. ^ "Contact MTA." Maryland Transit Administration. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "Maryland Transit Administration 6 St. Paul St. Baltimore, MD 21202-1614"
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i "DGS Managed Facilities William Donald Schaefer Tower." Maryland Department of General Services. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "Location 6 Saint Paul Street Baltimore, MD 21202"
  8. ^ "Home." Maryland Board of Contract Appeals. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "6 St. Paul Street, Suite 601 | Baltimore, MD 21202-1608"
  9. ^ "Contact Us." Maryland Governor's Office of Minority Affairs. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "Governor's Office of Minority Affairs Suite 1502 6 Saint Paul Street Baltimore MD 21202 "
  10. ^ "Home." Maryland Office of People's Counsel. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "6 Saint Paul Street, Suite 2102 - Baltimore, MD 21202"
  11. ^ "Home." Maryland Commission on Civil Rights. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "6 St Paul Street, Suite 900 - Baltimore MD 21202 - 1-800-705-3493"
  12. ^ "Contact." Maryland Office of the Public Defender. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "OPD Administration 6 Saint Paul Street Suite 1400 Baltimore, MD 21202 "
  13. ^ "Contact Us." Maryland Public Service Commission. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "William Donald Schaefer Tower 6 St. Paul St., 16th Floor Baltimore, MD 21202"
  14. ^ "Directions to MSRP." Maryland Teachers & State Employees Supplemental Retirement Plans. Retrieved on September 18, 2012. "Directions to MSRP Wm. Donald Schaefer Twr., Suite 200, 6 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Maryland 21202-1608"

External links[edit]