William Farina

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
William Edward Farina
200x217
William Farina
Born December 7, 1955
LaPorte, Indiana
Occupation Author, Essayist
Nationality United States
Genre Popular Non-Fiction

William Edward Farina (b. December 7, 1955, LaPorte, Indiana) is an American essayist and writer of popular non-fiction.

Biography[edit]

Farina was born, reared and educated in LaPorte, Indiana. He attended Valparaiso University on a baseball athletic scholarship and received his bachelor’s degree with a double major in English and Philosophy in 1978, then a law degree from the same institution in 1981. That same year he became a member of the Illinois bar and moved to Chicago.

Since 1979, he has enjoyed a successful career as a real estate analyst and consultant. The grandson of Sicilian immigrants on his father’s side, Farina is also a Mayflower descendant from his mother’s family. Broad contrasts in ethnic and cultural identities characterize his work. Farina participated as a volunteer for the 2008 election campaign in his native state of Indiana. Soon after this, in 2009, he and his wife Marion Buckley moved to Wisconsin, where they live today.

Career[edit]

Disappointed by the results of the 2004 elections, Farina resolved to devote spare time to the field of education. Foremost among his activities has been a projected series of short books on various scholarly topics, written from a layman’s perspective. Farina’s first collection, titled De Vere as Shakespeare: An Oxfordian Reading of the Canon (McFarland & Company, 2006) addresses the Shakespeare authorship question. It won the 2007 Award for Scholarly Excellence presented by the Shakespeare Authorship Studies Conference of Concordia University-Portland, and recently earned praise in Washington State University’s Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature. His second book, Ulysses S. Grant, 1861-1864: His Rise from Obscurity to Military Greatness, released in 2007, covers the early Civil War career of Grant from the perspective of Farina’s maternal ancestors, all of whom fought for the Confederacy.

Farina’s third work, Perpetua of Carthage: Portrait of a Third-Century Martyr (2008), was written to commemorate the centennial 1907 discovery for the Carthage tombs of SS. Perpetua, Felicity, and their companions, all martyred in 203 A.D. In 2007, Farina traveled to Carthage (including the famous Bardo Museum) in modern day, pre-revolutionary Tunisia, where three years later a lone act of suicide protest in Sidi Bouzid would unleash a wave of political unrest across the entire Islamic world.

His fourth book, Chrétien de Troyes and the Dawn of Arthurian Romance (2010), explores the central role of the great medieval French poet in shaping modern perceptions of the King Arthur legends. In conjunction with this project, Farina attended the 22nd triennial conference of the International Arthurian Society, held at the University of Rennes in Brittany, France, during the summer of 2008.

Eliot Asinof and the Truth of the Game: A Critical Study of the Baseball Writings (2011) surveys the extensive commentary on the National Pastime by the seminal American non-fiction writer and novelist, Eliot Asinof (1919-2008).

The German Cabaret Legacy in American Popular Music (2013) links the emblematic musical style of the Weimar Republic with the contemporary English-speaking pop vernacular of the late 20th century.

Man Writes Dog: Canine Themes in Literature, Law and Folklore (2014) examines 20 famous writers from the western tradition and their attitudes regarding relationships between humans, dogs, and wolves.

Works[edit]

De Vere as Shakespeare: An Oxfordian Reading of the Canon (2006)
Ulysses S. Grant, 1861-1864: His Rise from Obscurity to Military Greatness (2007)
Perpetua of Carthage: Portrait of a Third-Century Martyr (2008)
Chrétien de Troyes and the Dawn of Arthurian Romance (2010)
Eliot Asinof and the Truth of the Game: A Critical Study of the Baseball Writings (2011)
The German Cabaret Legacy in American Popular Music (2013)
Man Writes Dog: Canine themes in Literature, Law and Folklore (2014)

Quotes[edit]

"A more enlightened view is that Grant’s many faults underscore the profundity of his greatness. It also points the way to a better understanding of other American heroes, who were perhaps not as flawless as they are often made out to be by mythmakers posing as educators." (Ulysses S. Grant, 1861-1864)

“While Chrétien’s immediate contemporaries and continuators, along with his predecessors Geoffrey and Wace, first supplied or rendered the bulk of data that permanently manifested itself through various strands of the tradition, it was Chrétien who, nearly single-handedly, supplied something much more crucial. It was he who first injected the spirit of courtly love and romantic chivalry into what had previously been little more than a warrior myth.” (Chrétien de Troyes and the Dawn of Arthurian Romance)

External links[edit]