William Goodenough

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For other people named William Goodenough, see William Goodenough (disambiguation).
Sir William Goodenough
Born 2 June 1867
Portsmouth, England[1]
Died 30 January 1945
Coulsdon, Surrey, England[1]
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Years of service 1882–1930
Rank Admiral
Commands held

HMS Albemarle[2]
HMS Vengeance[2]
HMS Duncan[2]

HMS Cochrane
HMS Colossus
2nd Light Cruiser Squadron
Africa Station
Nore Command
Battles/wars World War I
Awards Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
Member of the Royal Victorian Order

Admiral Sir William Edmund Goodenough GCB, MVO (2 June 1867 – 30 January 1945) was a senior Royal Navy officer of World War I.

Naval career[edit]

Goodenough joined the Royal Navy in 1882.[3] He was appointed Commander of the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth in 1905.[3] He was given command of the cruiser HMS Cochrane in 1910 and of the battleship HMS Colossus in 1911.[4]

He served in World War I and commanded the 2nd Light Cruiser Squadron from 1913 to 1916, participating in the battles of Heligoland Bight in August 1914,[3] Dogger Bank in January 1915,[3] and Jutland in May to June 1916.[3] In the King's Birthday Honours of 3 June 1916, Goodenough was appointed an Additional Member of the Third Class, or Companion, in the Military Division of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (C.B.). He was promoted to the rank of Rear-Admiral on 10 June.

After the War he became Superintendent at Chatham Dockyard[3] and then, from 1920, Commander-in-Chief at the Africa Station.[3] He was made Vice Admiral commanding the Reserve Fleet in 1923 and Commander-in-Chief, The Nore in 1924.[3] He was First and Principal Naval Aide-de-camp to the King from 1929 to 1930.[3] He retired in 1930.[3]

In retirement he was President of the Royal Geographic Society from 1930 to 1933.,[3] and Chairman, of Barclays Bank, where he founded Goodenough Scholarships for the children of employees. In 1931 he led the establishment of Goodenough College.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
Sir Edward Fitzherbert
Commander-in-Chief, Africa Station
1920–1922
Succeeded by
Sir Rudolph Bentinck
Preceded by
Sir Douglas Nicholson
Commander-in-Chief, Reserve Fleet
1923–1924
Succeeded by
Sir Victor Stanley
Preceded by
Sir Hugh Evan-Thomas
Commander-in-Chief, The Nore
1924–1927
Succeeded by
Sir Edwyn Alexander-Sinclair
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Sir Richard Phillimore
First and Principal Naval Aide-de-Camp
1929–1930
Succeeded by
Sir Edwyn Alexander-Sinclair