William Hoogland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

William Hoogland (ca.1794-1832) was an engraver in Boston, Massachusetts, and New York in the early 19th-century.[1][2] "Career obscure; but was a designer and engraver of banknotes in New York in 1815."[3] In Boston, contemporaries included Abel Bowen, Annin & Smith, and J.V. Throop.[4][5] He taught engraving to Joseph Andrews.[6]

Image gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "William Hoogland, engraver, 2 Congress Square." Boston Directory. 1823.
  2. ^ "Library of Congress". Retrieved 05-09-2010.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  3. ^ Grolier Club. Catalogue of an exhibition of early American engraving upon copper]: 1727-1850, with 296 examples by 147 different engravers. De Vinne Press, 1908; p.40-41
  4. ^ Miniature portraits of the Marquis Lafayette. Boston Commercial Gazette, Aug. 23, 1824.
  5. ^ William Dunlap. History of the rise and progress of the arts of design in the United States, Volume 2. George P. Scott and Co., Printers, 1834; p.469
  6. ^ "Joseph Andrews." National cyclopaedia of American biography, v.11. 1901; p.77.

External links[edit]