William Hunter (Vermont politician)

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William Hunter
Member of the
United States House of Representatives
from Vermont's At-large district
In office
March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1819
Preceded by John Noyes
Succeeded by Ezra Meech
Personal details
Born (1754-01-03)January 3, 1754
Sharon, Connecticut, U.S.
Died November 30, 1827(1827-11-30) (aged 73)
Windsor, Vermont, U.S.
Political party Democratic-Republican
Spouse(s) Mary Newell Hunter[1]
Children William Hunter,[2] Mary Hunter,[3] and Jonathan Hunter.[4]
Profession Politician, Judge

William Hunter (January 3, 1754 – November 30, 1827) was an American judge and politician. He served as a U.S. Representative from Vermont.

Biography[edit]

Hunter was born in Sharon, Vermont to Mary Hunter to William Hunter Sr.[5] He attended the common schools. He resided near Fort Edward, New York from 1763 until 1775, when he moved to Windsor, Vermont. He served in the Revolutionary War as a sergeant and lieutenant under General Montgomery.[6]

He served as a member of the Vermont House of Representatives in 1795, 1807, and 1808.[7] He was the register of probate from 1798 until 1801, and judge of probate for the district of Windsor from 1801 until 1816.[8] He also served as Justice of the Peace in Windsor.[9] He was the Presidential Elector for Vermont in 1804.[10]

Hunter was the assistant judge of the Windsor County, Vermont court from 1805 until 1816, and was a member of the Vermont council of censors in 1806 and 1820.[11] He was a member of the executive council from 1810 until 1813 and in 1815.[12]

Hunter was elected as a Democratic-Republican candidate to the Fifteenth Congress, serving from March 4, 1817 until March 3, 1819.[13] He was not a candidate for reelection to the Sixteenth Congress.

Personal life[edit]

Hunter was married to Mary Newell Hunter on January 30, 1777.[14] They had three children together, all who died very young; William Hunter,[15] Mary Hunter[16] and Jonathan Hunter.[17]

Death[edit]

Hunter died in Windsor, Vermont on November 30, 1827. He is interred at Sheddsville Cemetery in West Windsor.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mary Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  2. ^ "William Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Mary Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Jonathan Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  5. ^ "William Hunter". Family Central. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  6. ^ "William Hunter". Our Campaigns. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  7. ^ Forbes, Charles S. (1917). The Vermonter,. Charles S. Forbes,. p. 220. 
  8. ^ Wilbur, La Fayette (1903). Early history of Vermont. Roscoe Printing House. p. 370. 
  9. ^ Vermont. General Assembly. House of Representatives (1808). A Journal of the General Assembly of the State of Vermont. The Legislature. p. 92. 
  10. ^ "Hunter, William (1754-1827)". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  11. ^ Vermont (1877). Records of the Governor and Council of the State of Vermont: Record of the Governor and Council, 1804-1813. J. & J. M. Poland. p. 240. 
  12. ^ "HUNTER, William, (1754 - 1827)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Rep. William Hunter". Govtrack.us. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Mary Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  15. ^ "William Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Mary Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Jonathan Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 
  18. ^ "William Hunter". Find A Grave. Retrieved November 26, 2012. 

External links[edit]


 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.