William Lazenby

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William Lazenby (died circa 1888) was an English publisher of pornography active in the 1870s and 1880s. He used the aliases Duncan Cameron and Thomas Judd. His notable publications include magazines The Pearl, which published poems thought to have been written by Algernon Charles Swinburne,[1][2][3] The Oyster,[4] The Boudoir[4][5] and The Cremorne[6][7][8] He also published such books as The Romance of Lust,[9][10][11] Randiana, or Excitable Tales,[12][13] The Birchen Bouquet (1881),[14] The Romance of Chastisement (1883)[15] and The Sins of the Cities of the Plain.[16][17] He was an associate of Edward Avery and Leonard Smithers.[18] He was prosecuted in 1871 and again in 1881.

After the Post Office (Protection) Act 1884, Lazenby together with other publishers such as Edward Avery, Charles Carrington, and Harry Sidney Nichols moved much of their business to Paris to sell in the United Kingdom by mail order.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Frank Bates, "Corporal Punishment in Legal, Historical and Social Context'", Manitoba Law Journal 12 (1982-1983), 337
  2. ^ Donald Serrell Thomas, Swinburne, the Poet in his World, Oxford University Press, 1979, ISBN 0-19-520136-1, 216
  3. ^ Thomas S. Weinberg S & M: Studies in Dominance & Submission (Prometheus Books, 1995), ISBN 0-87975-978-X, 226
  4. ^ a b Donald McCormick, Richard Deacon, Erotic literature: a connoisseur's guide (Continuum, 1992), ISBN 0-8264-0574-6, 61
  5. ^ Vance Randolph, "Unprintable Ozark Folksongs and Folklore: Blow the candle out" in Gershon Legman , ed., Roll Me in Your Arms: Unprintable Ozark Folksongs and Folklore, vol. 2 (University of Arkansas Press, 1992), ISBN 1-55728-237-4, 898
  6. ^ Paul Giles, Atlantic Republic: The American Tradition in English Literature (Oxford University Press, 2006), ISBN 0-19-920633-3, 149
  7. ^ Michael Matthew Kaylor, "Secreted Desires: The Major Uranians: Hopkins, Pater and Wilde" (Michael Matthew Kaylor, 2006), ISBN 80-210-4126-9, 15
  8. ^ Sigel, 64, 73-74
  9. ^ Gaétan Brulotte, John Phillips, Encyclopedia of Erotic Literature (CRC Press, 2006), ISBN 1-57958-441-1, 1048
  10. ^ Kearney, 9-10
  11. ^ Donald Serrell Thomas, A Long Time Burning: The History of Literary Censorship in England (Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1969), 273
  12. ^ Nelson, Claudia; Martin, Michelle H. (2004). Sexual pedagogies: sex education in Britain, Australia, and America, 1879-2000. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 30. ISBN 1-4039-6350-9. 
  13. ^ Mendes (1993) p.300
  14. ^ Sigel (2005) pp.73-74
  15. ^ Sigel (2005) pp.73-74,95-96
  16. ^ Matt Cook, London and the Culture of Homosexuality, 1885-1914 (Cambridge University Press, 2003), ISBN 0-521-82207-6, 19-22
  17. ^ Melissa Hope Ditmore, Encyclopedia of Prostitution and Sex Work (Greenwood Publishing Group, 2006), ISBN 0-313-32968-0, 442
  18. ^ James Nelson, Publisher to the Decadents: Leonard Smithers in the Careers of Beardsley, Wilde, Dowson (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000)
  19. ^ Sigel, 116
  • Patrick J. Kearney, A History of Erotic Literature (Macmillan, 1982), ISBN 0-333-34126-0
  • Patrick J. Kearney and Gershon Legman, The Private Case: An Annotated Bibliography of the Private Case Erotica Collection in the British (Museum) Library (J. Landesman, 1981)
  • Peter Mendes, Clandestine Erotic Fiction in English, 1800-1930: A Bibliographical Study (Scolar Press, 1993), ISBN 0-85967-919-5
  • Lisa Z. Sigel, International Exposure: Perspectives on Modern European Pornography, 1800-2000 (Rutgers University Press, 2005), ISBN 0-8135-3519-0