William Mace

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

William Mace (died 1767) was an English Gresham Professor of Law, from 1744,[1] and Fellow of the Royal Society.

Mace is known also for philosophical interests, where he has been considered a follower of George Berkeley, and a thinker who anticipated David Hume. He was a correspondent of Francis Hutcheson. His views on the mind-body problem, Hutcheson reports, were in circulation in Dublin.[2][3] He also was in touch with John Colson, and associated with Ephraim Chambers.[4]

Mace has frequently been confused with Daniel Mace, the real author of the anonymous New Testament in Greek and English of 1729.[1]

References[edit]

  • David Berman, Dr. Berkly's Books, Fortnight No. 308, Supplement: Francis Hutcheson (Jul. - Aug., 1992), p. 23. Published by: Fortnight Publications Ltd. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25553570

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Herbert McLachlan (1950). Essays and addresses. Manchester University Press. p. 234. GGKEY:73L68CSG953. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  2. ^ David Berman (20 August 2005). Berkeley and Irish Philosophy. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 143. ISBN 978-1-84714-427-0. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  3. ^ Berman, p. 23.
  4. ^ David Berman (20 August 2005). Berkeley and Irish Philosophy. Continuum International Publishing Group. pp. 147–8. ISBN 978-1-84714-427-0. Retrieved 5 April 2013.