William Markham (bishop)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from William Markham (archbishop))
Jump to: navigation, search
For the noted Atlantan, see William Markham; for the Pennsylvania colonial official, see William Markham (Governor).
Archbishop Markham.

William Markham (1719–1807), English divine and archbishop of York, was educated at Westminster and at Christ Church, Oxford.

He was one of the best scholars of his day, and attained to the headship of his old school and college in 1753 and 1767 respectively. Between those headships, he held the deanery of Rochester 1765–1767. He held from time to time a number of livings, and in 1771 was made bishop of Chester and tutor to the Prince of Wales (later George IV). In 1776 he became Archbishop of York, and also Lord High Almoner and privy councillor.

Memorial to Archbishop William Markham in York Minster

He was a fierce critic of pamphleteer Richard Price concerning the American rebellion. He was for some time a close friend of Edmund Burke, but his strong championship of Warren Hastings caused a breach. He was accused by Lord Chatham of preaching pernicious doctrines, and was a victim of the Gordon Riots in 1780.

He married Sarah, the daughter of John Goddard, a wealthy English merchant of Rotterdam, with whom he had six sons and seven daughters. Of his sons John was an eminent Naval officer, George was Dean of York from 1802 to 1822 and William was Private Secretary to Warren Hastings and built Becca Hall in Aberford.

References[edit]

  • Rev. David Frederick Markham (1854). A history of the Markham family. London: John Bowyer Nichols and sons.  (available at Internet Archive [1])

See also[edit]

Church of England titles
Preceded by
Edmund Keene
Bishop of Chester
1771–1776
Succeeded by
Beilby Porteus
Preceded by
Robert Hay Drummond
Archbishop of York
1776–1807
Succeeded by
Edward Harcourt