William Marshall Smart

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William Marshall Smart FRSE FRAS (9 March 1889, Doune, Perthshire – 17 September 1975, Lancaster) was a Scottish astronomer.

He was born in Doune to Peter Fernie Smart and Isabella Marshall Harrower. He was educated at the McLaren High School, in Callander, and graduated MA from Glasgow University in 1910 in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. He went on to graduate with a triple first in the Mathematical Triposes at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he won the Tyson Medal for Astronomy.[1]

He served in the Royal Navy during World War I as an instructor in navigation (RN College Greenwich 1915, HMS Emperor of India 1916–19) and then returned to Cambridge in 1919 as a lecturer in Mathematics and John Couch Adams Astronomer (1921–1937). With Commander FN Shearme, he wrote the Admiralty Manual of Navigation (1922). From 1937 to 1959 he was Regius Professor of Astronomy at Glasgow University. The first edition of his Text-Book on Spherical Astronomy (later co-authored) appeared in 1931.[2]

During World War II, Adams published four volumes on sea and air navigation that became textbooks in the armed services. He wrote more than twenty academic books during his career, and was recognised as a leader in his field.

He was President of the Royal Astronomical Society from 1949 to 1951, and was a member of the Royal Institute of Navigation.[3]

His children included Professor Ninian Smart and the utilitarian philosopher, Professor John Jamieson Carswell "Jack" Smart, (often known as J.J.C Smart).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Biography of William Marshall Smart". University of Glasgow. Retrieved 30 December 2010. 
  2. ^ William Marshall Smart, Robin Michael Green (1977). Textbook on Spherical Astronomy. Cambridge University Press. p. 252. ISBN 0-521-29180-1. 
  3. ^ Waterston, Charles D; Macmillan Shearer, A (July 2006). Former Fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh 1783–2002: Biographical Index II. Edinburgh: The Royal Society of Edinburgh. ISBN 978-0-902198-84-5. Retrieved 31 December 2010.