William Parker Caldwell

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William Parker Caldwell
William Parker Caldwell - Brady-Handy.jpg
United States Representative
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 9th district
In office
March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1879
Personal details
Born (1832-11-08)November 8, 1832
Christmasville, Tennessee
Died June 7, 1903(1903-06-07) (aged 70)
Gardner, Tennessee
Political party Democratic
Alma mater Cumberland School of Law
Profession lawyer

politician

William Parker Caldwell(November 8, 1832 - June 7, 1903) was an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for the 9th congressional district of Tennessee.

Biography[edit]

Caldwell was born in Christmasville in Carroll County, Tennessee, on November 8, 1832. He attended school at McLemoresville, Tennessee, and at Princeton, Kentucky. He studied law at Cumberland School of Law at Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tennessee, and was admitted to the bar in 1853.

Career[edit]

Caldwell practiced in Dresden and Union City, Tennessee. He served in the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1857 to 1859. He was a presidential elector on the Democratic ticket of Douglas and Johnson in 1860. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1868.[1] When the town of Gardner, Tennessee, incorporated in 1869, he became its first mayor.[2]

Elected as a Democrat to the Forty-fourth and Forty-fifth Congresses, he served from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879.[3] He was not a candidate for re-election to the Forty-sixth Congress in 1878. He resumed the practice of law in Gardner, Tennessee, and served in the Tennessee Senate from 1891 to 1893.

Death[edit]

Caldwell died in Gardner, Tennessee on June 7, 1903 (age 70 years, 211 days). He is interred at Caldwell Cemetery.[4] His house in Gardner is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "William Parker Caldwell". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 April 2013. 
  2. ^ Vaughan, Virginia C. (1983). Crawford, Charles W., ed. Tennessee county history series : Weakley County. Memphis State University Press. pp. 131–2. 
  3. ^ "William Parker Caldwell". Govtrack US Congress. Retrieved 16 April 2013. 
  4. ^ "William Parker Caldwell". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 16 April 2013. 
  5. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 

External links[edit]