William T. Kane

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William T. Kane
Bill and Ginny Kane.jpeg
William and Virginia Kane
Born (1932-09-08)September 8, 1932
Jamaica, New York, USA
Died September 23, 2008(2008-09-23) (aged 76)
Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming
Alma mater University of Missouri University of Kansas University of Colorado
Occupation Physicist
Religion Episcopal
Children

William P. Kane
Gretchen Gilbert
Ellen Jacobson

Kathleen "Cindy" Lewis
Notes
(1) Kane's three patents contributed to the early processing and manufacture of fiber optics.

(2) Kane participated in secret overflights over the former Soviet Union during the Cold War.

(3) Kane's principal work was with Corning Incorporated, formerly Corning Glass Works, in Corning, New York.

William T. Kane (September 8, 1932 – September 23, 2008) was a physicist for Corning Incorporated, formerly Corning Glass Works, Inc., in Corning, New York, who held patents in crystallography and heat-sensing technology—developments which contributed to the early processing and manufacture of fiber optics. He was also the Corning representative for the establishment of international standards in the use of fiber optics in communications.[1]

Kane attended the Universities of Colorado, Kansas, and Missouri in Boulder, Lawrence, and Columbia, respectively. He procured his Ph.D. in 1966 in X-Ray crystallography from the University of Missouri.[1]

Kane was also an Air Force officer, having served as a navigator in the Air Force's 55th and 38th Strategic Reconnaissance Wings from 1953 to 1959. As an electronics warfare officer, he participated in the Cold War overflights of the former Soviet Union, espionage missions not disclosed until years later. He earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. He was also an Air Force Reserve officer from 1959 to 1966, having departed the military with the rank of captain.[1]

He was born in Jamaica, New York, to Dr. J.T. Kane, a physician and surgeon originally from Brooklyn, and the former Marjory Lillian Davis, a native of London. He subsequently resided and worked in Big Flats, Corning, and Lake Placid, New York. In 1993, he retired to Cheyenne, Wyoming. He was an active skier and sportsman. He was a member of Rotary International and several fraternal and professional associations.[2]

Kane died at Pointe Frontier Retirement Center in Cheyenne after a lengthy illness. He was survived by his wife, Virginia L. "Ginny" Kane (1926–2009); a son, retired Air Force Brigadier General William P. Kane of Colorado Springs; three daughters, Gretchen Gilbert of Cedar Grove, New Jersey, Ellen Jacobson of Reno, Nevada, and Kathleen "Cindy" Lewis of Cheyenne; eight grandchildren; one great-grandson, and two sisters, June Kunz of Keene, New Hampshire, and Phyllis Lazarus of San Jose, California.[2]

Memorial services were held on September 27, 2008, at St. Christopher's Episcopal Church, 2602 Deming Boulevard, in Cheyenne.[2]

Patents[edit]

US Patent 4659435 - Integrally heated electrochemical cell method and apparatus

"A novel electrochemical cell including a solid electrolyte heated to an elevated temperature for operation and an integral cell electrode/heater for heating the electrolyte. Solid electrolyte embodiments are described. The integral electrode/heater is applied to a surface of the solid electrolyte and is resistively heated by an alternating electric current. A portion of the solid electrolyte may also be resistively heated. The described or comparable cells may be incorporated into an oxygen detector or similar apparatus where the apparatus is operated by alternately heating the cell and measuring the emf developed by the cell across its electrode.The invention is also, in part, a unique, solid electrolyte-integral cell electrode/heater configuration which provides a zone of uniform maximum heating at a predetermined location within the electrolyte and which, when used with a suitable resistive heating electric current, confines the current to the integral electrode/heater prolonging cell life. Another aspect of the invention is the use of a radio frequency alternating electric current for resistively heating an electrochemical cell. Preferably, the radio frequency selected is sufficiently high so as to eliminate any offsets in the emf developed by the cell which are caused by the heater current. The invention also includes an apparatus for measuring the concentration of particular gases, such as oxygen, incorporating either and, preferably, both other inventive aspects of the invention. The preferred cell configuration reduces the complexity of such an apparatus by eliminating the auxiliary heat source and provides a more accurate and reliable electrochemical sensing cell. Radio frequency heating allows the operations of cell heating and emf measurement to proceed independent and concurrently and provides a continuously responding, self-heating detection apparatus.[3]"

US Patent 4362580 - Furnace and method with sensor

"Oxygen sensor comprising solid oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte with a platinum group metal film electrode contacts and monitors nonoxidizing or reducing gas atmosphere in a metal heat treatment (gas carburizing) furnace after a getter of the same platinum group metal as in the film electrode removes platinum group metal contaminants from such atmosphere before it contacts the electrode. Getter is held in a thin-walled, multi-passaged honeycomb body.[4]"

US Patent 4290586 - Furnace and method with sensor

"Oxygen sensor comprising solid oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte with a platinum group metal film electrode contacts and monitors nonoxidizing or reducing gas atmosphere in a metal heat treatment (gas carburizing) furnace after a getter of the same platinum group metal as in the film electrode removes platinum group metal contaminants from such atmosphere before it contacts the electrode. Getter is held in a thin-walled, multi-passaged honeycomb body.[5]"

US Patent 4277322 - Oxygen sensor

"A metal film electrode on the outer surface of an electroded, oxygen-ion-conducting solid electrolyte, closed end portion of an oxygen sensor tube is maintained in contact with the electrolyte and in its electrical conducting function by a compressible, porous, ceramic boot firmly press-fit onto and over the electroded end portion in slidable and frictional engagement with the outer film electrode (including any connector or reinforcing wire therein or thereon). Boot has open porosity of greater than 50 (or 80) volume percent and can consist essentially of zirconia, such as a sintered mass of zirconia fibers.[6]"

US Patent 3958052 - Subsurface-fortified glass laminates

"Subsurface-fortified glass laminates exhibiting improved breakage characteristics and increased resistance to delayed breakage are described. Such laminates have particular utility in the fabrication of glass tableware.[7]"

References[edit]