William Theophilus Dortch

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William Dortch
Confederate States Senator
from North Carolina
In office
February 18, 1862 – May 10, 1865
Preceded by Constituency established
Succeeded by Constituency abolished
Personal details
Born (1824-08-23)August 23, 1824
Nash County, North Carolina, U.S.
Died November 21, 1889(1889-11-21) (aged 65)
Goldsboro, North Carolina, U.S.
Political party Democratic

William Theophilus Dortch (August 23, 1824 – November 21, 1889) was a prominent North Carolina and Confederate States of America politician and lawyer.

Early life[edit]

Dortch was born August 23, 1824[1] to William Dortch and his wife, Drusilla at his father's plantation, situated in Nash County, North Carolina about 5 miles from the town of Rocky Mount, North Carolina.[2]

Family Life[edit]

Dortch married Elizabeth Pittman of Edgecombe County, North Carolina, they had seven children. Dortch later married Hattie Williams of Berryville, Virginia, they had four children.[3]

Political career[edit]

Dortch was a member of the North Carolina General Assembly from 1852 to 1861. In 1860 Dortch served as Speaker of the House of Commons.[1]

During the Civil War, Dortch served as a senator from North Carolina in the First Confederate Congress and the Second Confederate Congress (from 1862 to 1865). During his term, Dortch was accused of sexual improprieties with a minor, but was exonerated after an investigation.

After the war, he again served in the legislature, first in the North Carolina House of Representatives, and then in the North Carolina Senate from 1879 to 1885. He was President pro tempore of that body from 1881 to 1883.

Death and burial[edit]

Dortch died November 21, 1889[3] in Goldsboro, North Carolina and was buried in Willow Dale Cemetery.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Warner, Jr., Ezra J. (1975), Biographical Register of the Confederate Congress, Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, p. 853. 
  2. ^ Strong, Robert C. (1916), North Carolina Reports, Volume 171, Raleigh, North Carolina: State of North Carolina, p. 842. 
  3. ^ a b Strong, Robert C. (1916), North Carolina Reports, Volume 171, Raleigh, North Carolina: State of North Carolina, p. 853. 
  4. ^ Warner, Jr., Ezra J. (1975), Biographical Register of the Confederate Congress, Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, p. 80. 

This article incorporates facts obtained from: Lawrence Kestenbaum, The Political Graveyard  bio

Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Settle
Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives
1860–1861
Succeeded by
Nathan Fleming
Preceded by
William Graham
President pro tempore of the North Carolina Senate
1881–1883
Succeeded by
Edwin Boykin
Confederate States Senate
New constituency Confederate States Senator (Class 2) from North Carolina
1862–1865
Served alongside: George Davis, Edwin Reade, William Graham
Constituency abolished