William Virgil Davis

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William Virgil Davis is an American poet.

He has published poems in Poetry, The Nation, The Hudson Review, The Georgia Review, The Hopkins Review, The Gettysburg Review, The New Criterion, The Sewanee Review, The Atlantic Monthly, Denver Quarterly, and Shenandoah, among others. He has also published several books of literary criticism, as well as critical essays in numerous periodicals. He is Professor of English and Writer-in-Residence at Baylor University.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

William Virgil Davis was born in the United States of America in 1940, in Ohio. He studied at Ohio University. He has lived and taught in Austria, Denmark and Wales for extended periods of time.

Awards[edit]

  • 1979 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize
  • 1984 Calliope Press Chapbook Prize
  • 2009 New Criterion Poetry Prize [3]
  • 2010 Helen C. Smith Memorial Award for Poetry

Works[edit]

Books[edit]

  • The Dark Hours, which won the Calliope Press Chapbook Prize
  • Winter Light
  • One Way to Reconstruct The Scene. Yale University Press. September 10, 1980. ISBN 978-0-300-02503-3. 
  • Landscape and Journey
  • The Bones Poems

Criticism[edit]

. George Whitefield's Journals, 1737-1741, Scholar's Facsimiles & Reprints,1969. Editor . Understanding Robert Bly, University of South Carolina Press, 1988. . Robert Bly: The Poet and His Critics, Camden House Publishers, 1994.

Anthologies[edit]

References[edit]

External references[edit]