William W. Hartzog

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William W. Hartzog
William Hartzog.JPEG
General William W. Hartzog
Born (1941-09-21) September 21, 1941 (age 73)
Wilmington, North Carolina
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1963-1998
Rank General
Commands held Training and Doctrine Command
1st Infantry Division
United States Army South
197th Infantry Brigade
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards Legion of Merit
Soldier's Medal
Bronze Star with "V" Device
Purple Heart
Other work CEO, Burdeshaw Associates

General William White Hartzog (born September 21, 1941) was a four-star U.S. Army general whose commands during his 35-year career include the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command, the 1st Infantry Division, and United States Army South. He was born in Wilmington, North Carolina.[1]

Military career[edit]

After graduating from The Citadel in 1963, where he received a degree in English, he was commissioned in the infantry. His first assignment after the Infantry Officer Basic Course was as Executive Officer of an Officer Candidate School company at Fort Benning. In 1965 he was assigned to Fort Kobbe, Panama. He deployed to Vietnam in 1967, eventually commanding a company, and upon return to the United States he attended the Infantry Officer Advanced Course. After graduation, he was assigned as a tactics instructor at the United States Military Academy, then returned to Vietnam in 1972 as a Plans Officer for Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. He attended the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College from 1973 to 1974, then proceeded to Fort Riley, where he served in various staff positions with the 1st Infantry Division. In April 1978, he was given command of the 193rd Infantry Brigade. Following his assignment in Panama, he attended the United States Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, and then served at the War Plans Division in Washington D.C., where he eventually became Chief. He was next assigned as Executive Officer at the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, before taking command of another brigade, the 197th Infantry Brigade at Fort Benning. After serving from 1987 to 1989 as the Assistant Commandant of the United States Army Infantry School, he returned to Panama for a third time as the J-3, United States Southern Command, a position he held during Operation Just Cause. He took command of United States Army South in 1990, and followed that command in 1991 with command of the 1st Infantry Division. He served as Deputy Commander in Chief/Chief of Staff, United States Atlantic Command from 1993 to 1994 before taking command of United States Army Training and Doctrine Command at Fort Monroe, from which he retired in 1998.

Awards and Decorations[edit]

Combat Infantry Badge.svg Combat Infantryman Badge
Expert Infantry Badge.svg Expert Infantryman Badge
US Army Airborne senior parachutist badge.gif Senior Parachutist Badge
United States Army Staff Identification Badge.png Army Staff Identification Badge
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Defense Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Legion of Merit with four oak leaf clusters
Soldier's Medal
V
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze Star with V Device and oak leaf cluster
Purple Heart
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Air Medal
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Commendation Medal with three oak leaf clusters

He was given the Appalachian State University Distinguished Alumni Award in 1996.[2]

Post military[edit]

After retiring from the Army, Hartzog became CEO of Burdeshaw Associates, a defense consulting firm,[3] sits on the Board of Directors of the Army Historical Foundation,[4] and is a member of the Defense Science Board.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
Frederick M. Franks, Jr.
Commanding General, United States Army Training and Doctrine Command
1994—1998
Succeeded by
John N. Abrams