Willie Miller

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For other people of the same name, see William Miller.
Willie Miller
Personal information
Full name William Ferguson Miller
Date of birth (1955-05-02) 2 May 1955 (age 59)
Place of birth Glasgow, Scotland
Height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Playing position Central defender
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1972–1990 Aberdeen 558 (20)
National team
1975–1989 Scotland 65 (1)
1976 Scottish League XI 1 (0)
Teams managed
1992–1995 Aberdeen
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

William Ferguson Miller, MBE (born 2 May 1955 in Glasgow) is a former professional football player who made a club record 558 league appearances for Aberdeen. Sir Alex Ferguson described Miller as "the best penalty box defender in the world".[1]

Club career[edit]

Miller signed for Aberdeen in 1972 at the age of seventeen and was made captain four years later by manager Ally McLeod. His central defensive partnership with Alex McLeish was integral to Aberdeen's success in the 1980s, as they won all the major domestic honours and the European Cup Winners' Cup in 1983. He retired from playing in 1990 due to an injury picked up whilst playing for Scotland. In 2003, Willie Miller was voted the greatest Aberdeen player of all time in a poll to mark the club's centenary.[2]

International career[edit]

Miller won 65 international caps for Scotland and scored one goal. He was an inaugural inductee to the Scottish Football Hall of Fame, in 2004.[3]

In 2010, Miller was chosen as one of the eleven members of Scotland's Greatest Team, by viewers of the Scottish Television documentary series, which sought the fans' opinion on the greatest ever Scotland players. Viewers also chose Alex McLeish as his central defence partner.

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

[1]

Club Season League Scot Cup Lge Cup Europe Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Aberdeen 1972–73 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
1973–74 31 1 1 0 9 0 4 0 46 0
1974–75 34 1 4 1 6 0 0 0 44 2
1975–76 36 0 2 1 6 0 0 0 44 1
1976–77 36 0 3 0 8 0 0 0 47 0
1977–78 36 2 6 0 6 0 2 0 50 2
1978–79 34 0 5 1 8 0 4 0 51 1
1979–80 31 1 5 1 8 0 2 0 46 2
1980–81 33 2 1 0 6 0 4 0 44 2
1981–82 36 0 6 0 10 0 6 0 58 0
1982–83 36 2 5 0 8 0 11 1 60 3
1983–84 34 2 7 1 9 1 10 0 60 4
1984–85 35 3 6 0 1 0 2 0 43 3
1985–86 33 1 6 1 6 0 6 1 51 3
1986–87 36 2 3 0 2 0 2 0 43 2
1987–88 42 3 6 0 5 0 4 0 57 3
1988–89 22 1 0 0 5 2 2 0 29 3
1989–90 15 0 0 0 5 0 2 0 22 0
1990–91 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Career total 560 21 66 6 109 3 61 2 797 32

International[edit]

[4]

Scotland national team
Year Apps Goals
1975 1 0
1978 1 0
1979 1 0
1980 6 1
1981 7 0
1982 5 0
1983 9 0
1984 6 0
1985 8 0
1986 8 0
1987 4 0
1988 7 0
1989 2 0
Total 65 1

Honours[edit]

Managerial career[edit]

In February 1992, he was appointed Aberdeen manager, replacing the sacked Alex Smith. Despite two second-place finishes in the league and two losing cup finals, Miller was sacked in February 1995.

In May 2004, Miller was appointed to the Aberdeen board and given executive responsibility for football. He played a large role in the appointment of Jimmy Calderwood as manager.[5]

In June 2011, he was appointed as Aberdeen's Director of Football Development, with the responsibility of finding new playing talent for the club.[6]

Career outside football[edit]

He has worked for the BBC as a football commentator and analyst between leaving Aberdeen as manager in 1995 and returning as Director of Football in 2004. He has written two autobiographies, The Miller's Tale and The Don, the latter being published in 2007.[7] His third book, Willie Miller's Aberdeen Dream Team, was published in 2011.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harry Reid (2005), The Final Whistle?, Birlinn, 237–8 ISBN 1-84158-362-6
  2. ^ "Miller is greatest Don". BBC Sport. 13 May 2003. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 
  3. ^ "Hall of Fame Dinner 2004". Scottish Football Museum. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  4. ^ Willie Miller at National-Football-Teams.com
  5. ^ "Aberdeen target Calderwood". BBC Sport. 24 May 2004. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 
  6. ^ "Willie Miller becomes director of football at Aberdeen". BBC Sport. 23 June 2011. Retrieved 25 March 2012. 
  7. ^ "Miller reveals football memories". BBC Sport. 30 October 2007. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 

External links[edit]

  • Willie Miller, Post War English & Scottish Football League A – Z Player's Database