Wilson Hungerford

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Sir Alexander Wilson Hungerford (1884–19 January 1969), known as Wilson Hungerford, was a Unionist politician in Northern Ireland.

Born in Belfast, Hungerford was employed by the Irish Unionist Party from 1912. In 1921, he became Secretary of the Ulster Unionist Council, serving until 1941, and was also Secretary of the Ulster Unionist Labour Association. At the Northern Ireland general election, 1929, Hungerford was elected to represent Belfast Oldpark.[1] He was also knighted in 1929.[1]

Hungerford was appointed as an Assistant Whip in 1933, and given the title "Assistant Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Finance". In 1941, he moved to become Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Commerce. In 1943 he moved to the same post in the Ministry of Home Affairs, and in 1944 to Health and Local Government, before becoming Chief Whip in November, serving until the 1945 general election, when he lost his seat.[1]

In 1948, Hungerford was elected to the Senate of Northern Ireland, serving until 1957, including a stint as Deputy Speaker from 1953 until 1956.[1]

He retired to England and lived at Dragons, a prominent house in Upper Park, Loughton, Essex.

References[edit]

Parliament of Northern Ireland
Preceded by
New position
Member of Parliament for Belfast Oldpark
1925 - 1945
Succeeded by
Robert Getgood
Party political offices
Preceded by
Dawson Bates
Secretary of the Ulster Unionist Council
1921–1941
Succeeded by
Billy Douglas
Preceded by
Sir Basil Brooke
Unionist Assistant Whip
1933–1941
Succeeded by
Sir Norman Stronge
Preceded by
Sir Norman Stronge
Unionist Chief Whip
1944–1945
Succeeded by
Lancelot Curran
Political offices
Preceded by
Sir Basil Brooke
Assistant Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Finance
1933–1941
Succeeded by
Sir Norman Stronge
Preceded by
William Lowry
Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Home Affairs
1943–1944
Succeeded by
Vacant
Preceded by
Sir Norman Stronge
Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Finance
1944–1945
Succeeded by
Lancelot Curran