Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead

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Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead
Unitary authority, Borough, Royal borough
Shown within Berkshire
Shown within Berkshire
Coordinates: 51°28′00″N 0°40′00″W / 51.4667°N 0.6667°W / 51.4667; -0.6667Coordinates: 51°28′00″N 0°40′00″W / 51.4667°N 0.6667°W / 51.4667; -0.6667
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region South East England
Ceremonial county Berkshire
Status Unitary authority
Incorporated 1 April 1974
Admin HQ Maidenhead
Government
 • Type Unitary authority
 • Body Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council
 • Leadership Leader & Cabinet (Conservative)
 • MPs Adam Afriyie, Theresa May
Area
 • Total 76.61 sq mi (198.43 km2)
Area rank 167th (of 326)
Population (2011 est.)
 • Total 145,100
 • Rank 133rd (of 326)
 • Density 1,900/sq mi (730/km2)
 • Ethnicity 90.2% White
5.4% S.Asian
1.2% Black
1.7% Mixed Race
1.4% Chinese or Other[1]
Time zone GMT (UTC0)
 • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)
ONS code 00ME (ONS) E06000040 (GSS)
OS grid reference SU926750
Website www.rbwm.gov.uk

The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead is a Royal Borough of Berkshire, in South East England. It is home to Windsor Castle, Eton College, Legoland and Ascot Racecourse.

The borough was formed on 1 April 1974 as a non-metropolitan district of Berkshire, under the Local Government Act 1972, from parts of the former administrative counties of Berkshire and Buckinghamshire. From Berkshire came the boroughs of Maidenhead and Windsor, and the rural districts of Cookham and Windsor, and from Buckinghamshire came the Eton urban district, and the parishes of Datchet, Horton and Wraysbury from the rural district of Eton.[2] It inherited royal borough status from Windsor, the site of Windsor Castle.

The local authority is Windsor and Maidenhead Borough Council[citation needed] . It became a unitary authority on 1 April 1998 with the abolition of Berkshire County Council.[3] It is the only Royal Borough outside Greater London.

Floods[edit]

As with many other parts of the United Kingdom, the Borough was affected by the UK storms of January-February 2014.

Towns and villages[edit]

The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead contains the following towns and villages

Politics[edit]

Westminster[edit]

The Royal Borough is represented at Westminster by two members of parliament of the Conservative Party: Adam Afriyie (Windsor) and Theresa May (Maidenhead). The UK Parliamentary constituency of Maidenhead has been held by the Conservative Party since its creation in 1997, while the UK Parliamentary constituency of Windsor has been held by the Conservative Party since its creation in 1874. The two seats are considered to be safe Conservative seats.

Local government[edit]

The Royal Borough is currently under a Conservative administration. Elections for councillors to the Royal Borough take place every four years; the last took place in 2011.

The political control of the Royal Borough is as follows:[4][5]

Party in control Years
Conservative 1973–1991
No overall control 1991–1995
Liberal Democrats 1995–1997
No overall control 1997–2003
Liberal Democrats 2003–2007
Conservative 2007–present

The 23 wards of the Royal Borough are represented by 57 councillors as follows:[6]

Ward Party Councillor(s)
Ascot and Cheapside Conservative David Hilton, Duncan McBride
Belmont Conservative Sinead Archer, Phil Love, Marion Mills
Bisham and Cookham Conservative Richard Kellaway, Michael Saunders, John Stretton
Boyn Hill Conservative Christian Harris, Paul Lion, Claire Stretton
Bray Conservative David Burbage, David Coppinger, Leo Walters
Castle Without Mixed George Bathurst (Con), Catherine Bursnall (UKIP), Sue Evans (Con)
Clewer East Mixed Tom Bursnall (UKIP), Eileen Quick (Con)
Clewer North West Windsor Residents' Association Cynthia Endacott, John Fido, John Penfold
Clewer South Conservative James Evans, Simon Meadowcroft
Cox Green Conservative Paul Brimacombe, Clive Bullock, Alan Mellins
Datchet Conservative Jesse Grey, Gary Muir
Eton and Castle Liberal Democrats George Fussey
Eton Wick Conservative Peter Lawless
Furze Platt Conservative Mohammed Ilyas, Hari Sharma, Derek Sharp
Horton and Wraysbury Conservative John Lenton, Colin Rayner
Hurley and Walthams Conservative Carwyn Cox, David Evans, Maureen Hunt
Maidenhead Riverside Conservative Simon Dudley, Andrew Jenner, Adam Smith
Oldfield Conservative Geoffrey Hill, Asghar Majeed, Derek Wilson
Old Windsor Old Windsor Residents' Association Malcolm Beer, Lynne Jones
Park Conservative Natasha Airey, Phillip Bicknell
Pinkneys Green Mixed Charles Hollingsworth (Con), Kathy Newbound (LD), Simon Werner (LD)
Sunningdale Conservative Christine Bateson, Sayonara Luxton
Sunninghill and South Ascot Conservative Peter Comber, John Story, Lynda Yong

Since the election, Councillors Tom and Catherine Bursnall have switched allegance from the Conservative party to the UK Independence Party.[7]

Parish and town councils[edit]

There are 14 parish councils and 1 town council in the borough. They are: Bisham, Bray, Cookham, Cox Green, Datchet, Eton (town), Horton, Hurley, Old Windsor, Shottesbrooke, Sunningdale, Sunninghill and Ascot, Waltham St Lawrence, White Waltham, Wraysbury.

The towns of Maidenhead and Windsor are unparished.

Education[edit]

Unlike the rest of Berkshire, the Windsor and Maidenhead LEA uses the three-tier system.[8]

Twin towns[edit]

The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead is twinned with the following Towns:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Population estimates
  2. ^ The English Non-metropolitan Districts (Definition) Order 1972. SO 1972/2039.
  3. ^ The Berkshire (Structural Change) Order 1996. SI 1996/1879
  4. ^ UK Politics | Local Elections 2000 | Windsor & Maidenhead Royal. BBC News. Retrieved on 17 July 2013.
  5. ^ Election 2007 | Local Council Elections | Windsor & Maidenhead Royal council. BBC News (4 May 2007). Retrieved on 17 July 2013.
  6. ^ [1][dead link]
  7. ^ Tory couple latest in switch to UKIP
  8. ^ "School system in Windsor to remain as three-tier". Windsor Advertiser. 5 July 2012. 
  9. ^ "British towns twinned with French towns". Archant Community Media Ltd. Retrieved 11 July 2013.