Winning Lines

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For the U.S. version, see Winning Lines (U.S. game show).
Winning Lines
Format Game show
Created by David Briggs
Steve Knight
Mike Whitehill
Presented by Simon Mayo (1999–2000)
Phillip Schofield (2001–4)
Country of origin United Kingdom
Original language(s) English
No. of series 6
No. of episodes 81
Production
Location(s) The Fountain Studios
Running time 35 minutes (1999)
40 minutes (2000)
45 minutes (2001–4)
Production company(s) Celador
Broadcast
Original channel BBC One
Picture format 16:9
Original run 12 June 1999 (1999-06-12) – 16 October 2004 (2004-10-16)
Chronology
Preceded by We've Got Your Number
Followed by Red Alert
Related shows Talking Telephone Numbers
Winning Lines (US version)

Winning Lines was a National Lottery game show that ran on BBC One in the United Kingdom from 12 June 1999 to 16 October 2004. It was originally hosted by Simon Mayo from 1999 to 2000, then Phillip Schofield from 2001 to 2004.

Round 1[edit]

49 contestants took part in this round, but only six would move on to round two. The host reads a question that can be answered by a number from 1 to 49. Anyone who thinks that their own number is the answer buzzes in. If the owner of that number buzzed, he or she moves on to round two. Anyone who buzzed but was wrong is eliminated. If the owner didn't buzz, but should have, he or she is out. This process repeats until 6 people qualify for the second round.

The last digit from each of the winner's numbers are shown at the end of the show. If all 6 numbers match the last 6 digits of your phone number in any order then you can call in to try to appear on the next show.

In series two onwards, this changed to the host asking the 49 contestants a question with a number for an answer. The contestants use keypads to enter their answers, and the contestant who keyed in the correct answer in the quickest time possible moved on to Round 2. The contestants who keyed in the correct answer but not in the quickest time possible and the contestants who did not key in an answer moved on to the next question. The contestants who key in an incorrect answer were eliminated. This continues until six have qualified for the next round. All of the remaining 43 contestants are eliminated.

Round 2 - Looking After Number One[edit]

Each contestant carries their number from Round 1 with them to Round 2. Schofield (or Mayo) asks questions that can be answered by one of the six numbers in play. Contestants buzz in to answer the question. A right answer means that the owner of that number is eliminated, unless the person who buzzed in had the number; in that case no one is eliminated. If the contestant is wrong, regardless of whose number the answer is, he or she is eliminated. If nobody answers, the person with the answer is eliminated. This goes on until one contestant is remaining. The winner plays the Wonderwall for a grand prize trip.

Bonus Round - The Wonderwall[edit]

The champion is asked as many questions as possible in three minutes, the answers to which appear on three projection screens and are numbered 1-49. When answering, players must give both the number and its answer before moving onto the next question. Each answer wins a better trip as follows, and 20 correct answers wins a three-week trip around the world. Players were given 15 seconds to check out the answers on display before beginning the round as well as two "pit stops", each of which froze the timer for 15 seconds to allow the player to look over the board again; however they cannot answer during this time. During Schofield's run, the winner of the grand prize then played the Wonderwall again (on the same day as the Wednesday Lotto draw) to win as much spending money as possible. Right answers were worth £200, with a possible £4,000 at stake. The 15-second browse before the game still applied but there were no "pit stops".

Correct Answers Prize
20 Around the World
19 Australia
18 Barbados
17 Hawaii
16 Texas
15 African Safari
14 Caribbean Cruise
13 Mauritius
12 USA
11 Hong Kong
10 New York
9 Italy
8 Majorca
7 Monte Carlo
6 Paris
5 Amsterdam
4 Ireland
3 Scottish castle
2 London
1 Spaghetti Junction

Transmissions[edit]

Series Start date End date Episodes
1
12 June 1999
4 September 1999
13
2
15 April 2000
22 July 2000
13
3
9 June 2001
24 November 2001
22
4
3 August 2002
2 November 2002
14
5
19 July 2003
18 October 2003
13
6
11 September 2004
16 October 2004
6

Ratings[edit]

Episode Viewing figures from BARB.[1]

Series 1[edit]

Episode No. Airdate Total Viewers BBC One Weekly Ranking
1 12 June 1999 8,460,000 9
2 19 June 1999 7,490,000 13
3 26 June 1999 7,000,000 12
4 3 July 1999 7,770,000 8
5 10 July 1999 6,560,000 13
6 17 July 1999 7,760,000 8
7 24 July 1999 6,860,000 12
8 31 July 1999 6,340,000 12
9 7 August 1999 8,490,000 6
10 14 August 1999 8,240,000 10
11 21 August 1999 7,350,000 12
12 28 August 1999 5,790,000 21
13 4 September 1999 Under 5,310,000 Outside Top 30

Series 2[edit]

Episode No. Airdate Total Viewers BBC One Weekly Ranking
1 15 April 2000 6,940,000 19
2 22 April 2000 5,910,000 29
3 29 April 2000 5,520,000 30
4 6 May 2000 5,560,000 27
5 13 May 2000 5,290,000 28
6 20 May 2000 5,560,000 25
7 27 May 2000 7,090,000 17
8 3 June 2000 7,420,000 11
9 10 June 2000 5,990,000 17
10 1 July 2000 5,190,000 22
11 8 July 2000 6,280,000 14
12 15 July 2000 6,380,000 14
13 22 July 2000 5,990,000 16

Series 3[edit]

Episode No. Airdate Total Viewers BBC One Weekly Ranking
1 9 June 2001 5,650,000 24
2 16 June 2001 6,220,000 16
3 23 June 2001 5,850,000 19
4 30 June 2001 5,660,000 12
5 7 July 2001 5,790,000 12
6 14 July 2001 5,820,000 17
7 21 July 2001 5,730,000 20
8 28 July 2001 4,990,000 18
9 4 August 2001 5,010,000 16
10 11 August 2001 6,290,000 12
11 18 August 2001 7,630,000 6
12 25 August 2001 7,290,000 6
13 8 September 2001 7,370,000 9
14 15 September 2001 7,760,000 12
15 22 September 2001 7,680,000 11
16 29 September 2001 7,360,000 13
17 6 October 2001 7,900,000 10
18 13 October 2001 8,310,000 11
19 27 October 2001 7,820,000 10
20 3 November 2001 8,200,000 10
21 17 November 2001 7,180,000 18
22 24 November 2001 7,000,000 18

Series 4[edit]

Episode No. Airdate Total Viewers BBC One Weekly Ranking
1 3 August 2002 4,910,000 15
2 10 August 2002 5,830,000 12
3 17 August 2002 4,840,000 21
4 24 August 2002 5,910,000 12
5 31 August 2002 4,950,000 21
6 7 September 2002 5,010,000 21
7 14 September 2002 5,270,000 21
8 21 September 2002 5,310,000 17
9 28 September 2002 5,840,000 19
10 5 October 2002 6,810,000 14
11 12 October 2002 6,120,000 17
12 19 October 2002 5,960,000 17
13 26 October 2002 6,380,000 16
14 2 November 2002 6,400,000 15

Series 5[edit]

Episode No. Airdate Total Viewers BBC One Weekly Ranking
1 19 July 2003
2 26 July 2003 5,570,000 11
3 2 August 2003 4,470,000 23
4 9 August 2003 3,940,000 26
5 16 August 2003 Under 3,970,000 Outside Top 30
6 23 August 2003 5,100,000 19
7 30 August 2003 4,380,000 23
8 13 September 2003 5,330,000 14
9 20 September 2003 5,600,000 17
10 27 September 2003 5,720,000 16
11 4 October 2003 6,410,000 14
12 11 October 2003 4,910,000 27
13 18 October 2003 5,600,000 20

Series 6[edit]

Episode No. Airdate Total Viewers BBC One Weekly Ranking
1 11 September 2004 5,600,000 12
2 18 September 2004 5,560,000 14
3 25 September 2004 6,260,000 10
4 2 October 2004 5,640,000 14
5 9 October 2004 5,490,000 14
6 16 October 2004 5,410,000 17

American version[edit]

An American version of Winning Lines aired on CBS in 2000 between January 8 to February 18. It was presented by Dick Clark. In the first round, Like the British Winning Lines, it had 49 contestants. The differences were that in Round 1 instead of contestants answering questions with answers arranging from 1 to 49, they had to answer six mathematical questions, each with a numerical answer, and the contestants have five seconds to enter their answers on numerical keypads. On each question, the contestant who enters the correct answer in the shortest time advances to the next round. The other 43 contestants are eliminated at the end of the round. Round 2 stayed true to the British Winning Lines. Round 3 also stayed true to the British Winning Lines except that the contestant was playing for money instead of a holiday.

References[edit]

External links[edit]