Winnsboro, South Carolina

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Winnsboro, South Carolina
Town
Location of Winnsboro, South Carolina
Location of Winnsboro, South Carolina
Coordinates: 34°22′37″N 81°5′17″W / 34.37694°N 81.08806°W / 34.37694; -81.08806
Country United States
State South Carolina
County Fairfield
Area
 • Total 3.2 sq mi (8.4 km2)
 • Land 3.2 sq mi (8.4 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 535 ft (163 m)
Population (2007)
 • Total 3,564
 • Density 1,109.6/sq mi (428.4/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 29180
Area code(s) 803
FIPS code 45-78460[1]
GNIS feature ID 1251474[2]
Website www.townofwinnsboro.com

Winnsboro is a town in Fairfield County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 3,599 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Fairfield County[3]. Winnsboro is part of the Columbia, South Carolina Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Several years before the Revolution, Richard Winn from Virginia moved to what is now called Fairfield County. His lands covered the present site of Winnsboro, and as early as 1777 the settlement was known as "Winnsborough".

The village was laid out and chartered in 1785 upon petition of Richard Winn, John Winn and John Vanderhorst. John, Richard, and Minor Winn all served in the Revolutionary War. Richard was a general and he is said to have fought in more battles than any Whig in South Carolina. John was a colonel. See Fairfield County, South Carolina for more.

When the Freedom Riders rode interstate buses into the segregated southern United States during the 1960s, Winnsboro was one of the locations where they were beaten and arrested.[4]

The traditional blues song Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues was written about working in a cotton mill in Winnsboro; the song has been sung by Lead Belly, Pete Seeger, and other artists and was reworked by modernist composer/pianist Frederic Rzewski.

Albion, Balwearie, Blair Mound, Dr. Walter Brice House and Office, Concord Presbyterian Church, Furman Institution Faculty Residence, Hunstanton, Ketchin Building, Bob Lemmon House, Liberty Universalist Church and Feasterville Academy Historic District, McMeekin Rock Shelter, Mount Olivet Presbyterian Church, New Hope A.R.P. Church and Session House, Old Stone House, Rockton and Rion Railroad Historic District, Rural Point, Shivar Springs Bottling Company Cisterns, The Oaks, Tocaland, White Oak Historic District, and the Winnsboro Historic District are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[5]

Geography[edit]

Winnsboro is located at 34°22′37″N 81°5′17″W / 34.37694°N 81.08806°W / 34.37694; -81.08806 (34.377069, -81.087959)[6].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 3.2 square miles (8.3 km2), all land.

Demographics[edit]

The Fairfield County Courthouse in 1940
Tocaland is one of twenty-one sites in Winnsboro listed on the National Register of Historic Places

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 3,564 people, 1,454 households, and 984 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,109.6 people per square mile (428.9/km²). There were 1,597 housing units at an average density of 492.4 per square mile (190.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 40.29% White, 58.46% African American, 0.31% Asian, 0.33% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.31% of the population.

There were 1,454 households out of which 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.7% were married couples living together, 25.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.3% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the town the population was spread out with 27.8% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 80.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 75.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $25,094, and the median income for a family was $29,550. Males had a median income of $29,275 versus $18,925 for females. The per capita income for the town was $14,135. About 23.6% of families and 24.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 33.9% of those under age 18 and 14.1% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ Watson, Dylan (August 2, 2011). "Freedom Rides Again". Gambit. 
  5. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°22′37″N 81°05′17″W / 34.377069°N 81.087959°W / 34.377069; -81.087959