Winslow Township, New Jersey

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Winslow Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Winslow
Winslow highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Winslow highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Winslow Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Winslow Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°42′06″N 74°54′30″W / 39.701722°N 74.908351°W / 39.701722; -74.908351Coordinates: 39°42′06″N 74°54′30″W / 39.701722°N 74.908351°W / 39.701722; -74.908351[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated November 26, 1867
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Barry M. Wright (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Joseph Gallagher[4]
 • Clerk Deborah A. Iannaco[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 58.192 sq mi (150.716 km2)
 • Land 57.342 sq mi (148.515 km2)
 • Water 0.850 sq mi (2.201 km2)  1.46%
Area rank 24th of 566 in state
1st of 37 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 135 ft (41 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 39,499
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 39,165
 • Rank 56th of 566 in state
4th of 37 in county[11]
 • Density 688.8/sq mi (265.9/km2)
 • Density rank 414th of 566 in state
34th of 37 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08095[12]
Area code(s) 609, 856[13]
FIPS code 3400781740[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882150[1][16]
Website www.winslowtownship.com

Winslow Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 39,499,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 4,888 (+14.1%) from the 34,611 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,524 (+15.0%) from the 30,087 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Winslow Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 8, 1845, from portions of Gloucester Township. Portions of the township were taken on November 26, 1867, to create Chesilhurst. In 1950, the township annexed a portion of Monroe Township (in Gloucester County).[18]

Geography[edit]

Winslow Township is located at 39°42′06″N 74°54′30″W / 39.701722°N 74.908351°W / 39.701722; -74.908351 (39.701722,-74.908351). According to the United States Census Bureau, township had a total area of 58.192 square miles (150.716 km2), of which, 57.342 square miles (148.515 km2) of it was land and 0.850 square miles (2.201 km2) of it (1.46%) of it was water.[1][2]

The Blue Hole is a body of water in the middle of woods that is clear blue and always cold, even in the summer, with a very steep shoreline and a maximum depth of approximately 70 feet (21 m).

Winslow Township consists of several neighborhoods and communities, which include Sicklerville, Tansboro, Cedar Brook, Blue Anchor, West Atco, Braddock, Albion, Ancora, Elm, Winslow Village and Waterford Works.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,540
1860 1,800 16.9%
1870 2,050 * 13.9%
1880 2,158 5.3%
1890 2,408 11.6%
1900 2,392 −0.7%
1910 2,919 22.0%
1920 3,379 15.8%
1930 4,744 40.4%
1940 4,866 2.6%
1950 5,102 4.8%
1960 9,142 79.2%
1970 11,202 22.5%
1980 20,034 78.8%
1990 30,087 50.2%
2000 34,611 15.0%
2010 39,599 14.4%
Est. 2013 39,165 [10][19] −1.1%
Population sources: 1850-2000[20]
1850-1920[21] 1850-1870[22] 1850[23]
1870[24] 1880-1890[25]
1890-1910[26] 1910-1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[18]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 39,499 people, 13,735 households, and 10,178 families residing in the township. The population density was 688.8 per square mile (265.9/km2). There were 14,560 housing units at an average density of 253.9 per square mile (98.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 54.41% (21,491) White, 36.17% (14,287) Black or African American, 0.29% (113) Native American, 3.10% (1,224) Asian, 0.04% (14) Pacific Islander, 2.97% (1,172) from other races, and 3.03% (1,198) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 8.10% (3,200) of the population.[7]

There were 13,735 households, of which 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.7% were married couples living together, 16.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.25.[7]

In the township, 25.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.3 years. For every 100 females there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $68,169 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,425) and the median family income was $78,892 (+/- $4,026). Males had a median income of $53,815 (+/- $1,828) versus $44,860 (+/- $2,189) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,884 (+/- $974). About 4.1% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.[31]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 34,611 people, 11,661 households, and 9,002 families residing in the township. The population density was 599.9 people per square mile (231.6/km²). There were 12,413 housing units at an average density of 215.1/sq mi (83.1/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 69.34% White, 29.34% African American, 0.35% Native American, 1.30% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.58% from other races, and 1.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.31% of the population.[29][30]

There were 11,661 households out of which 41.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.2% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.8% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.28.[29][30]

In the township the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 34.4% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 8.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.5 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the township was $55,990, and the median income for a family was $62,045. Males had a median income of $43,320 versus $31,657 for females. The per capita income for the township was $21,254. About 4.5% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.1% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

History[edit]

Winslow Township is Camden County's largest municipality at 58 square miles (150 km2). The township got its name from the son of a 19th-century glass factory owner, William Coffin, Sr., who bought large tracts of timber in Camden County about six miles west of Hammonton and with his son-in-law in 1929. Thomas Jefferson Perce and William Coffin, Jr., built a glass works (his second one in 12 years) in the midst of a thick pine forest. The community was named for Senior Coffin's youngest son, Edward Winslow Coffin.

Winslow Township was incorporated in 1845 from the Township of Gloucester.[18] The township's very first meeting was held at Josiah Albertson's Blue Anchor Inn which was located on what is now Route 73 in the vicinity of St Lucy's Church. During its early years Winslow was known for its thriving glass business which developed as a result of the townships abundant resources of timber clay and sand., though by the start of the 20th century the glass industry died throughout Winslow.[32] During the early 20th century, Winslow's population continued to grow until it peaked at a small 11,000 residents by the 1970s. During this time period the majority of Winslow residents were farmers. In 1965, Winslow township started to see an increase in population as the Atlantic City Expressway was completed with an interchange in Winslow at Williamstown Road. The proximity of the interchange drew developers towards the Sicklerville section of the township, where Levitt & Sons would build thousands of homes throughout the 1970s. Between 1970 and 1980 Winslow's population nearly doubled to 20,000 residents.

As of 2006, 80% of the township currently sits in the Pinelands National Reserve, thus restricting future land development. Despite the restriction of development on the reserve, agricultural areas still persist in Winslow.

The township is also served by two area codes—856 and 609. When area code 609 was split in 1999, the southern/eastern end in the township (primarily with the Hammonton mailing address, Cedarbrook, and a small section of Sickerville) were left in the 609 code, while the other sections closer to Berlin and Williamstown received 856 as their area code.

Landmarks
  • St Lucy's Roman Catholic Church, Route 73. It became a parish in 1961. The Rev. Edward McDaid is pastor.
  • Bates Mills Cemetery is a cemetery located on South Erhke Road in Blue Anchor, New Jersey. Today passersby can observe a number of very old grave stones with hardly visible faded initials engraved upon them. The stones seem to be made from iron ore.
  • Pinelands National Reserve
  • Levitt and Sons Incorporated build Winslow crossing in the 1970s in Sicklerville. The complexes that were built at this time were Primrose Gate, Manor Hall, Victoria Manor, Eden Hollow, Lehigh Manor, Arbor Meadows and Ivy Meadows.
  • In 1972, the Lutheran affiliated Winslow Community Church opens in the Cedarbrook Hunting and Fishing Club.
Historical timeline
  • 1845: Winslow is incorporated from Gloucester Township.
  • 1920: Albion School is built.
  • 1923: Sicklerville School is built.
  • 1925: St. Lucys Roman Catholic Church begins in the Blue Anchor section of Winslow Township as a mission to Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Berlin, New Jersey.
  • 1928: Blue Anchor and Tansboro Schools are built.
  • 1940: Closed Dunbarton and North Tansboro Schools are sold.
  • 1955: A hospital is established at Ancora.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Winslow Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government by a mayor and an eight-member Township Committee. The mayor is elected at-large to a four-year term of office. Committee Members are elected in partisan elections to three-year terms in office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election from each of the four wards in two consecutiver years as part of the November general election.[5]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Winslow Township is Barry Wright, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Winslow Township Committee are:[33][34][35]

  • Ward 1: Karen Gibison (2014) and Anthony Tomasello (R, 2015)
  • Ward 2: Evelyn Leverett (2014) and George Lowery (D, 2015)
  • Ward 3: Marie D. Lawrence (2014) and Raymond Watkins, Jr. (D, 2015)
  • Ward 4: Charles Flamini (2014) and John A. Wilson (D, 2015)

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Winslow Township is located in the 1st Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 4th state legislative district.[8][37][38] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Winslow Township had been in the 6th state legislative district.[39]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[40] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[41][42] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[43][44]

The 4th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Fred H. Madden (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and in the General Assembly by Paul Moriarty (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and Gabriela Mosquera (D, Gloucester Township).[45] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[47]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with wither two or three seats coming up for election each year.[48] As of 2014, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[49], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2016)[50], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[51], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[52], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[53], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[54] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2016).[55][56][57] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[58] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[59] and Surrogate Patricia Egan "Pat" Jones.[60]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 24,975 registered voters in Winslow Township, of which 10,782 (43.2%) were registered as Democrats, 2,898 (11.6%) were registered as Republicans and 11,283 (45.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.[61]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 68.5% of the vote here (12,630 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 29.0% (5,355 votes), with 18,445 ballots cast among the township's 24,426 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.5%.[62] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 62.2% of the vote here (9,305 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 36.6% (5,478 votes), with 14,963 ballots cast among the township's 21,944 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.2.[63]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 56.5% of the vote here (5,711 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 37.4% (3,775 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 3.7% (377 votes), with 10,102 ballots cast among the township's 24,894 registered voters, yielding a 40.6% turnout.[64]

Education[edit]

The Winslow Township School District is a public school district that serves students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grades. The district was formed in 1998, after voters approved a split from the Lower Camden County Regional School District, creating the Edgewood (later renamed Winslow) middle and high schools in 2001 to accompany the previously existing K-6 operation.[65]

As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's eight schools had an enrollment of 4,932 students and 435.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.33:1.[66] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[67] are Winslow Township Elementary School No. 1[68] (337 students; in grades PreK-3), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 2[69] (317; PreK-3), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 3[70] (378; PreK-3), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 4[71] (443; PreK-3), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 5[72] (675; 4-6), Winslow Township Elementary School No. 6[73] (540; 4-6), Winslow Township Middle School[74] (842; 6-8) and Winslow Township High School[75] (1,400; 9-12).[76][77]

Students from Chesilhurst attend the district's schools as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Chesilhurst Borough School District. The Chesilhurst district had served public school students in Kindergarten through sixth grade at Shirley B. Foster Elementary School until the completion of the 2008-09 school year, after which the district was no longer operating any schools and began sending all of its students to the Winslow Township schools as part of an expansion of the pre-existing sending/receiving relationship that commenced in the 2009-10 school year.[78][79]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 245.16 miles (394.55 km) of roadways, of which 159.89 miles (257.32 km) were maintained by the municipality, 57.57 miles (92.65 km) by Camden County and 16.50 miles (26.55 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 11.20 miles (18.02 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority.[80]

Winslow is criss-crossed by several major roads, such as U.S. Route 30, Route 73, and Route 143. The Atlantic City Expressway passes through the southwestern part of the township, with four interchanges: Exits 41, 38, 33, and 31.[81]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service is available on the 316 with seasonal service between Cape May and Philadelphia and the 400 route between Sicklerville and Philadelphia. Local service is available on the 459 bus between Voorhees Town Center and the Avandale park-and-ride and the 463 route between Woodbury and the Avandale park-and-ride. Service to Atlantic City is offered on the 551 route between Ocean City and Philadelphia and on the 554 route to the Lindenwold station.[82][83] There are no buses that provide service within reasonable walking distance to the Municipal Building.

Park and Ride bus service is located within the township at the Avandale park and ride, which offers 322 parking spots for NJ Transit passengers.[84]

Wineries[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Winslow Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Departmental Directory, Winslow Township, New Jersey. Accessed March 10, 2011.
  5. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 33.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Winslow, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Winslow Township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 12, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Winslow township, Camden County, New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 12, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 12, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Winslow, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 12, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Winslow, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 1, 2014.
  14. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  16. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  18. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 201. Accessed May 12, 2012.
  19. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
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  22. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 279, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 23, 2013. "Winslow contained in 1850, 1,540 inhabitants; in 1860, 1,800; and in 1870, 2,050."
  23. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 23, 2013.
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  25. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 23, 2013.
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  27. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed May 12, 2012.
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  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Winslow township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 11, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Winslow township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 12, 2012.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Winslow township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  32. ^ Lurie, Maxine N.; and Mappen, Marc. "Winslow Township", Encyclopedia of New Jersey, p. 879, Rutgers University Press, 2004. ISBN 0-8135-3325-2. Accessed March 10, 2011.
  33. ^ Winslow Township Officials, Winslow Township. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  34. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Winslow Township. Accessed November 2, 2014.
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  42. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  43. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  47. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
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  49. ^ Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  50. ^ Edward McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  52. ^ Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  53. ^ Scot N. McCray, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  54. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  55. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
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  65. ^ Arnold, Stephanie L. "Getting Down To Work On Schools In Winslow, Site Preparation Is One Step Toward Expansions And Renovations.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, August 8, 1999. Accessed November 2, 2014. "DeLosso said the target date for completion of the project was September 2001. That also is the year when the Lower Camden County Regional School District is scheduled to disband. Its seven towns - Berlin Township, Chesilhurst, Clementon, Lindenwold, Pine Hill, Waterford and Winslow - will become responsible for educating their own students."
  66. ^ District information for Winslow Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  67. ^ School Data for the Winslow Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  68. ^ Winslow Township Elementary School No. 1, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  69. ^ Winslow Township Elementary School No. 2, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  70. ^ Winslow Township Elementary School No. 3, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  71. ^ Winslow Township Elementary School No. 4, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  72. ^ Winslow Township Elementary School No. 5, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  73. ^ Winslow Township Elementary School No. 6, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  74. ^ Winslow Township Middle School, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  75. ^ Winslow Township High School, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  76. ^ Contact Us, Winslow Township School District. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  77. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Winslow Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  78. ^ Osborne, James. "N.J. to investigate Chesilhurst school district", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 12, 2010. Accessed November 2, 2014. "Up until last year, Chesilhurst functioned as a traditional school district and maintained a single elementary school. In the spring of 2009, the school board voted to close that school and bus its students to Winslow, leaving Chesilhurst to operate in an administrative capacity with a skeleton staff. Chesilhurst, a small district on the edge of the Pinelands, subsequently was declared a non-operating district by the state and set for closure at the end of June 2010."
  79. ^ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2010, Chesilhurst Board of Education. Accessed November 2, 2014. "Up through the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the District provided a full range of educational services appropriate to grade levels Pre-K through 6.... Beginning in the 2009-2010 fiscal year, the District entered into a sending/receiving tuition arrangement with Winslow Township Board of Education which included all students."
  80. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  81. ^ AC Expressway Map, South Jersey Transportation Authority. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  82. ^ Camden County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed May 12, 2012.
  83. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  84. ^ Park and Ride Guide, Cross County Connection, effective April 1, 2007. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  85. ^ Jessica Boyington, WPSG, September 4, 2010. Accessed September 17, 2012. "Jessica currently resides in Sicklerville, New Jersey."
  86. ^ Narducci, Marc. "Sicklerville's Burroughs excited for shot at Olympic gold", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 27, 2012. "A Sicklerville resident and 2006 graduate of Winslow Township High in Camden County, Burroughs is considered the favorite to win the gold in freestyle wrestling at 74 kilograms (163 pounds)."
  87. ^ Georgia Tech profile: Dennis Davis, Jr., CSTV. Accessed December 6, 2007.
  88. ^ Nelson, Jim. "Hawkeye profile: 'Low mainteance' Greene accepts limited role on offense.", The Courier (Waterloo-Cedar Falls), October 12, 2006. Accessed November 14, 2008.
  89. ^ Andrew Kessler Hay, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 25, 2007.

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