Wisdom Healing Qigong

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Wisdom Healing Qigong (Zhineng or Tzu-Nen Qigong, 智能气功) is a medical system of qigong developed by Grandmaster Dr. Ming Pang in the 1970s and 1980s as a synthesis of many ancient lineages of Chinese healing practices.[1][2] This style of qigong was originally developed for use in the world’s largest Chinese "medicine-less hospital", and is now practiced widely throughout the world. The Wisdom Healing Qigong style (also known as Chi-Lel Qigong) is characterized by group practice, with practitioners "organizing the Chi Field," a technique they believe enhances healing. The style employs a comprehensive system of qigong movement, meditation, visualization, sound vibration healing, chanting, and spiritual awareness techniques for healing.[3][4]

Etymology[edit]

Zhineng Qigong (Tzu-Nen Qigong, 智能气功), is generally translated as "wisdom healing qigong", and is also translated as "cultivating intelligent energy".[5][6] Zhi (Tzu, 智), the Chinese character for wisdom, literally means "knowing the source (represented by the sun) and experiencing/eating the source with full commitment (represented by the vow and mouth)". Neng (Nen, 能) means "power" or "ability to heal". Qigong (气功) means "energy work" or "cultivation of life energy". Zhineng Qigong refers to a complete system of qigong practices focused on health, healing, and consciousness. Chi-Lel Qigong is a trademark version of Zhineng Qigong and means "life energy therapy" qigong.

Origin[edit]

Wisdom Healing Qigong is attributed to Grandmaster Dr. Ming Pang, who in the 1970s and 1980s synthesized diverse elite and secretive Qigong lineages, previously practiced individually or in small groups as part of Taoist, Buddhist, medical, and martial arts traditions. The result was a comprehensive qigong system suitable for practice in large groups, with the primary focus on health and healing.[7]

Based on a lifetime of qigong practice and study, in 1979 Dr. Ming Pang founded the Beijing Qigong Research Society. In subsequent years, he gained increasing recognition and influence. He led efforts to establish a solid scientific basis for qigong and, more generally, for traditional Chinese medicine. In 1988, he founded the world’s largest "medicine-less hospital", the Huaxia Zhineng Qigong Clinic and Training Center, with Wisdom Healing Qigong as the primary treatment method.[8]

Principles[edit]

The basis of Wisdom Healing Qigong is summarized by Dr. Ming Pang as follows:

"…use of the mind’s intelligence to direct chi to transform, perfect and realize the conscious potential of the holistic body, thereby uplifting the consciousness of the practitioner from automated condition to that of autonomous wisdom. It is a path to equality, freedom and peace of humanity."

In general, Wisdom Healing Qigong practitioners equate qi (life energy) with consciousness and believe in the importance of the mind and the heart in healing.

Practice[edit]

Six "Golden Keys" form the foundation of Wisdom Healing Qigong practice:[9]

  • Haola: a mantra that means "All is well. "
  • Inner Smile: cultivation of a feeling of deep inner happiness.
  • Love and Service: practices believed to accelerate healing
  • Trust and Belief: practices believed to further enhance healing.
  • The Chi Field: visualizing a sea of healing life energy.
  • Diligent Practice: a sustained, committed effort involving movement, meditation, visualization, sound healing, chanting, and spiritual awareness

The beginning of Wisdom Healing Qigong practice sessions involve "connecting with source energy" and "organizing a chi field", a practice involving strong visualization of being bathed in healing energy. The term Chi Field was first used by Dr. Ming Pang to describe a collective energy field, which he believed can be drawn upon to enhance healing and added to through practice of qigong.[10]

Wisdom Healing Qigong practice includes the following qigong forms:

  • Spinal Bone Marrow
  • Hip Rotation
  • Bending Spine
  • Chen Chi
  • Lao Chi
  • Standing Meditation
  • Sound Vibration Healing
  • Lift Chi Up, Pour Chi Down

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chan, Hou Hee. 2002. Chi-Lel Qigong: Body and Mind Method - Based on the Teachings of Dr. Pang Ming. Benefactor Press. ISBN 978-0963734198.
  2. ^ Hin, Oou Kean. 2010. Zhineng Qigong: The science, theory and practice. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. ISBN 978-1453867600.
  3. ^ Jin, Xiaoguang. 1999. Life More Abundant: The Science of Zhineng Qigong Principles and Practices. Infinity Publishing. ISBN 978-0741400734.
  4. ^ Liu, Yuantong. 2008. Basic Theories and Methods Of Zhineng Qigong. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. ISBN 978-1440403491.
  5. ^ Gu, Mingtong. 2009. An Introduction to Wisdom Healing Qigong. Petaluma, CA: The Chi Center.
  6. ^ Gu, Mingtong. 2011. Wisdom Healing (Zhineng) Qigong. Petaluma, CA: The Chi Center. ISBN 978-0-9835043-0-6.
  7. ^ Gu, Mingtong. 2011. Wisdom Healing (Zhineng) Qigong. Petaluma, CA: The Chi Center. ISBN 978-0-9835043-0-6.
  8. ^ Chan, Hou Hee. 2002. Chi-Lel Qigong: Body and Mind Method- Based on the Teachings of Dr. Pang Ming. Benefactor Press. ISBN 978-0963734198.
  9. ^ Gu, Mingtong. 2011. Wisdom Healing (Zhineng) Qigong. Petaluma, CA: The Chi Center. ISBN 978-0-9835043-0-6.
  10. ^ Gu, Mingtong. 2011. Wisdom Healing (Zhineng) Qigong. Petaluma, CA: The Chi Center. ISBN 978-0-9835043-0-6.