Wishing Well (Terence Trent D'Arby song)

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For other uses, see Wishing well (disambiguation).
"Wishing Well"
Single by Terence Trent D'Arby
from the album Introducing the Hardline According to Terence Trent D'Arby
B-side "Elevators & Hearts"
Released 1987
Format 7" single, 12" maxi,
CD single, cassette
Genre R&B
Length 3:33
Label CBS Records
Writer(s) Terence Trent D'Arby, Sean Oliver
Producer(s) Terence Trent D'Arby, Martyn Ware
Certification Gold (RIAA)
Terence Trent D'Arby singles chronology
"If You Let Me Stay"
(1987)
"Wishing Well"
(1987)
"Dance Little Sister"
(1987)

"Wishing Well" is a song by Terence Trent D'Arby. The second single from the 1987 album Introducing the Hardline According to Terence Trent D'Arby, the song reached number one on both the Soul Singles Chart and the Billboard Hot 100 on May 7, 1988 (1988-05-07).[1] "Wishing Well" was certified "Gold", indicating sales of 500,000, by the Recording Industry Association of America in October 1991. Written by D'Arby and Sean Oliver, D'Arby said "Wishing Well" was written "when I was in a half-asleep, half-awake state of mind", and that he "liked the feel of the words".[2] Martyn Ware of Heaven 17 paired with D'Arby in production of the song, which was released on CBS Records.[2][3] Once released, "Wishing Well", along with D'Arby's debut single "If You Let Me Stay", went into "heavy rotation" on MTV.[4] D'Arby performed the song live at the 30th Annual Grammy Awards, where he lost the Grammy Award for Best New Artist to Jody Watley. When the single reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100, it had charted for 17 weeks, which made it the slowest song to reach number one since "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" in 1983.[5]

Ben Greenman of The New Yorker credits "Wishing Well", along with other D'Arby songs, with "[bringing] soul music into the eighties".[6] Writing about D'Arby for AllMusic, Stephen Thomas Erlewine called the song "sparse funk", and noted how "Wishing Well" was his first major hit in the United States.[7] Kathi Whalen of The Washington Post credited the song's chart success to D'Arby's combination of "'60s soul and pop on top", and called "Wishing Well" "bouncy".[8] The song appears in Grand Theft Auto: Episodes from Liberty City‍‍ '​‍s fictional radio station Vice City FM.[9]

Track listings[edit]

7" single
  1. "Wishing Well" (3:33)
  2. "Elevators & Hearts" (4:41)
12" maxi
  1. "Wishing Well" (Three Coins in a Fountain mix) (6:14)
  2. "Elevators & Hearts" (4:41)
  3. "Wishing Well" (The Cool in the Shade mix) (7:50)
  4. "Wonderful World" (3:56)
12" maxi
  1. "Wishing Well" (The Cool in the Shade mix) (7:50)
  2. "Wonderful World" (3:56)
  3. "Elevators & Hearts" (4:04)
Cassette
  1. "Wishing Well" (3:33)
  2. "Elevators & Hearts" (4:04)

Charts and sales[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942–2004. Record Research. p. 145. 
  2. ^ a b Bronson, Fred (2003). The Billboard Book of Number One Hits. Random House LLC. p. 697. ISBN 978-0-8230-7677-2. 
  3. ^ Hogan, Ed. "Wishing Well". AllMusic. 
  4. ^ Corcoran, Michael (June 1988). "In the Ring with Terence Trent D'Arby". Spin (Spin Media LLC) 4 (3): 45–46. ISSN 0886-3032. 
  5. ^ DeKnock, Jan (May 6, 1988). "'Wishing Well' Finally Pays Off". Chicago Tribune (Tribune Company).  (subscription required)
  6. ^ Greenman, Ben (June 4, 2013). "What Ever Happened to Terence Trent D'Arby?". The New Yorker (Condé Nast Publications). 
  7. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. All Music Guide to Soul: The Definitive Guide to R&B and Soul. Hal Leonard Corporation. p. 177. ISBN 978-0-87930-744-8. 
  8. ^ Whalen, Kathi (December 21, 1989). "Terence Trent D'Arby". The Washington Post (Nash Holdings LLC).  (subscription required)
  9. ^ Rockstar Games (April 13, 2013). "Grand Theft Auto: Episodes from Liberty City". PlayStation 3. 
  10. ^ "Austriancharts.at – Terence Trent D'Arby – Wishing Well" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40.
  11. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – week 39, 1987" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40
  12. ^ "Lescharts.com – Terence Trent D'Arby – Wishing Well" (in French). Les classement single.
  13. ^ "Officialcharts.de – Terence Trent D'Arby – Wishing Well". GfK Entertainment.
  14. ^ "Charts.org.nz – Terence Trent D'Arby – Wishing Well". Top 40 Singles.
  15. ^ "Swisscharts.com – Terence Trent D'Arby – Wishing Well". Swiss Singles Chart.
  16. ^ "Archive Chart: 1987-07-11" UK Singles Chart.
  17. ^ "Terence Trent D'Arby Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot 100 for Terence Trent D'Arby.
  18. ^ "Terence Trent D'Arby Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs for Terence Trent D'Arby.
  19. ^ "Terence Trent D'Arby Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Dance/Electronic Songs for Terence Trent D'Arby.
  20. ^ "Terence Trent D'Arby Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs for Terence Trent D'Arby.
  21. ^ "Single top 100 over 1987" (PDF) (in Dutch). Top40. Retrieved 21 September 2010. 
  22. ^ "American single certifications – Terence Trent D'Arby – Wishing Well". Recording Industry Association of America.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH
Preceded by
"Man in the Mirror" by Michael Jackson
Billboard Hot Black Singles number-one single
April 2, 1988
Succeeded by
"Ooo La La La" by Teena Marie
Preceded by
"Where Do Broken Hearts Go" by Whitney Houston
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
May 7, 1988
Succeeded by
"Anything for You" by Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound Machine
Preceded by
"Get Outta My Dreams, Get into My Car" by Billy Ocean
Canadian RPM Singles Chart number-one single
May 7, 1988 - May 14, 1988
Succeeded by
"Always on My Mind" by Pet Shop Boys