Wolfenstein (series)

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Wolfenstein
Genres First-person shooter, Stealth
Developers Muse Software, id Software, Raven Software, Gray Matter Interactive, Nerve Software, Splash Damage, MachineGames
Publishers Activision (2000-2009)
Bethesda Softworks (present)
Platforms Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, OS X, Linux, Xbox, PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One and various others
First release Castle Wolfenstein
1981
Latest release Wolfenstein: The New Order
May 20, 2014
Official website www.wolfenstein.com

Wolfenstein is a series of World War II video games, originally developed by Muse Software.[1] The third game in the franchise, Wolfenstein 3D, was developed by id Software, and is widely regarded to have helped popularize the first-person shooter genre. In 2001, the series was rebooted with Return to Castle Wolfenstein, developed by Gray Matter Interactive. This was followed by Raven Software's Wolfenstein in 2009, and MachineGames' Wolfenstein: The New Order in 2014.

The majority of the games follow protagonist William "B.J." Blazkowicz, and his fights against the Nazi powers. The New Order is set in an alternate history in which the Axis Powers won the Second World War.

History[edit]

The first-person view of the player character, atop a destroyed bridge, shooting a Nazi with his machine gun.
The series focuses on the antagonism of the Third Reich. The violent murdering of Nazis in the series has been met with controversy, particularly in Germany, where most of the games have been banned and/or censored.

Castle Wolfenstein is a 2D adventure game released in 1981 for the Apple II, written by Silas Warner. One of the pioneers of the stealth game genre, it is a game of avoiding detection and managing limited resources while trying to escape from a Nazi stronghold. Combat was allowed, but bullets were precious, and non-violent options were often safer, such as pulling a gun on a guard and frisking him while his hands were raised. A sequel, Beyond Castle Wolfenstein, was published in 1984.[1]

Wolfenstein 3D, released in 1992, is a re-imagining of the Castle Wolfenstein scenario in first person with an emphasis on direct combat. Stealth and non-violent options are not present. Silas Warner, the designer of the original Apple II games, was not involved in the development. Wolfenstein 3D is important for popularizing the first person shooter and inventing many of the tropes that became standard in the genre.


Games[edit]

Year Title Developer Platform(s)
Console Computer Handheld Mobile
1981 Castle Wolfenstein Muse Software
1984 Beyond Castle Wolfenstein
  • Apple II
  • MS-DOS
  • Atari 400/800
  • Commodore 64
1992 Wolfenstein 3D id Software GBA
Spear of Destiny MS-DOS iOS
2001 Return to Castle Wolfenstein Gray Matter Interactive, id Software, Nerve Software, Splash Damage
2003 Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory Splash Damage, id Software
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • OS X
2008 Wolfenstein RPG Fountainhead Entertainment, id Software
2009 Wolfenstein Raven Software, id Software, Endrant Studios, Blur Studios Windows
2014 Wolfenstein: The New Order MachineGames, id Software
Windows

Related games[edit]

  • Commander Keen (1990) - William Joseph "Billy Blaze" Blazkowicz II (Commander Keen) is the grandson of William "B.J." Blazkowicz.
  • Doom II: Hell on Earth (1994) - Level 31 (Wolfenstein) of Doom II is based on the first level of Wolfenstein 3D, and Level 32 (Grosse) is a Wolfenstein-based level mixed with elements of Doom.
  • Super 3D Noah's Ark (1994) - Wolfenstein 3D with modified graphics and sounds.
  • Rise of the Triad: Dark War (1995) - Was originally going to be a sequel to Wolfenstein 3D called Rise of the Triad: Wolfenstein 3D II.
  • Enemy Territory: Quake Wars (2007) - Enemy Territory: Quake Wars is a spin-off of Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory.
  • Wolfenstein 1-D (2011) - A demake of Wolfenstein 3D

Film[edit]

In an announcement made at the American Film Market (AFM), producer Samuel Hadida and Panorama Media said they've tapped Roger Avary to write and direct Castle Wolfenstein. According to a press release: "Castle Wolfenstein is an action adventure film in the vein of Captain America and Inglourious Basterds. The story follows a young US Army Captain and a British Special Agent on a top secret mission to Castle Wolfenstein, where Hitler will be for the unveiling of a new secret weapon. After reaching the Castle, our heroes are confronted with Himmler’s SS Paranormal Division and must fight, not only for their survival, but for a mission that could alter the course of the War."[2]

Reception[edit]

Game System Metacritic Game Rankings
Wolfenstein 3D GBA
60% (9 reviews)[3]
Xbox 360 66/100 (10 reviews)[4] 63% (8 reviews)[5]
PlayStation 3 77/100 (6 reviews)[6] 78% (4 reviews)[7]
Return to Castle Wolfenstein PC 88/100 (32 reviews)[8] 87% (50 reviews)[9]
Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory PC 90/100 (6 reviews)[10] 88% (7 reviews)[11]
Wolfenstein RPG iOS
88% (6 reviews)[12]
Wolfenstein PC 74/100 (41 reviews)[13] 74% (25 reviews)[14]
Xbox 360 72/100 (66 reviews)[15] 74% (55 reviews)[16]
PlayStation 3 71/100 (58 reviews)[17] 73% (44 reviews)[18]
Wolfenstein: The New Order PC 82/100 (15 reviews)[19] 85% (6 reviews)[20]
Xbox One 79/100 (17 reviews)[21] 82% (17 reviews)[22]
PlayStation 4 79/100 (65 reviews)[23] 80% (43 reviews)[24]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Halter, Ed (2006). From Sun Tzu to Xbox: War and Video Games. PublicAffairs. p. 155. ISBN 978-1-56025-681-6. 
  2. ^ Vejvoda, Jim (1 November 2012). "Castle Wolfenstein Movie Announced". IGN. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  3. ^ "Wolfenstein 3D for Game Boy Advance". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Wolfenstein 3D for Xbox 360 Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Wolfenstein 3D for Xbox 360". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Wolfenstein 3D for PlayStation 3 Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Wolfenstein 3D for PlayStation 3". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Return to Castle Wolfenstein for PC Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Return to Castle Wolfenstein for PC". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Return to Castle Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory for PC Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Return to Castle Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory for PC". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Wolfenstein RPG for iOS (iPhone/iPad)". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Wolfenstein for PC Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Wolfenstein for PC". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Wolfenstein for Xbox 360 Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Wolfenstein for Xbox 360". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Wolfenstein for PlayStation 3 Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Wolfenstein for PlayStation 3". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  19. ^ "Wolfenstein: The New Order for PC Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Wolfenstein: The New Order for PC". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  21. ^ "Wolfenstein: The New Order for Xbox One Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  22. ^ "Wolfenstein: The New Order for Xbox One". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  23. ^ "Wolfenstein: The New Order for PlayStation 4 Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014. 
  24. ^ "Wolfenstein: The New Order for PlayStation 4". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 7, 2014.