Wolseley 4/44

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Wolseley 4/44
Wolseley Four forty four ca 1955 in Hertfordshire.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer BMC
Production 1953-1956
29,845[1]
Designer Gerald Palmer
Body and chassis
Body style 4-door saloon
Powertrain
Engine Morris XPAW 1250 cc in-line 4
Dimensions
Wheelbase 102 in (2,600 mm)[2]
Length 168 inches (4267 mm)[1]
Width 61 in (1,500 mm)[2]
Chronology
Predecessor Wolseley 4/50
Successor Wolseley 15/50

The Wolseley 4/44 was originally designed under the Nuffield Organisation but by the time it was released in 1953 Wolseley was part of BMC. Much of the design was shared with the MG Magnette ZA which came out later in the same year.

Unlike the MG, the 4/44 used the 1250 cc XPAW engine a version of the XPAG engine previously seen in the later MG T-type series of cars but detuned by only having a single carburettor. The power output was 46 bhp (34 kW) at 4800 rpm.[1] The four speed manual transmission had a column change.

The construction was monocoque with independent suspension at the front by coil springs and a live rear axle.

The car had upmarket trim with wooden dashboard and leather seats and a traditional Wolseley radiator grille with illuminated badge but was expensive at GBP997 on the home market.[1]

An example tested by The Motor magazine had a top speed of 73 mph (117 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 29.9 seconds. A fuel consumption of 27.6 miles per imperial gallon (10.2 L/100 km; 23.0 mpg-US) was recorded.[2]

It was replaced in 1956 by the similar Wolseley 15/50.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Robson, Graham (2006). A-Z British Cars 1945-1980. Devon, UK: Herridge & Sons. ISBN 0-9541063-9-3. 
  2. ^ a b c "The Wolseley 4/44 Road Test". The Motor. July 8, 1953.