Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant

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Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant
Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant is located in South Korea
Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant
Location of Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant
Official name 월성원자력발전소
Country South Korea
Location Gyeongju, North Gyeongsang
Coordinates 35°43′0″N 129°28′40″E / 35.71667°N 129.47778°E / 35.71667; 129.47778Coordinates: 35°43′0″N 129°28′40″E / 35.71667°N 129.47778°E / 35.71667; 129.47778
Status Operational
Construction began 1976
Commission date 1982
Nuclear power station
Reactor type PHWR
OPR-1000
Reactor supplier CANDU
Power generation
Units operational 1 X 678 MW (Wolseong I)
3 X 700 MW (Wolseong II-IV)
1 X 997 MW (Shin-Wolsong 1)
Units under const. 1 × 960 MW (Shin-Wolsong 2)
Nameplate capacity 3738

The Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant, or Wolsong,[1] is a nuclear power plant located on the coast near Nae-ri, Yangnm-myeon, Gyeongju, North Gyeongsang province, South Korea. It is the only South Korean nuclear power plant operating CANDU-type PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors).[2] Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power owns the plant.[3] These reactors are capable of consuming multiple types of fuel, including wastes from South Koreas other nuclear plants.

The power plant site including Yangnam-myeon. Yangbuk-myeon and Gampo-eup was designated an industrial infrastructure development zone in 1976. Construction of Wolseong 1 started in 1976 and was completed in 1982. In the following year, the power plant began commercial operations. This PHWR reactor has a gross generation capacity of 678 MW. Wolseong reactors 2, 3 and 4 were completed in 1997, 1998 and 1999, respectively. Each of these reactors has a capacity of 700 MW. Wolseong Nuclear Plant has since operated successfully.[2]

Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant supplies about 5% of South Korea's electricity.[4]

Shin-Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant[edit]

Shin-Wolsong No. 1 and No. 2, are two new OPR-1000 type pressurized water reactors. Shin-Wolsong 1 became fully operational in July 2012.[1][5][6]

In June 2013 Shin-Wolsong 1 was shutdown, and Shin-Wolsong 2 ordered to remain offline, until safety-related control cabling with forged safety certificates is replaced.[7] Shin Wolsong-1 was approved for restart in January 2014.[8] In November 2014, Shin Wolsong-2 loaded its first core of nuclear fuel in preparation for commissioning.[8]

Unit Type Net Capacity
(MW)
Construction
start
Operation
start
Notes
Phase I
Wolsong-1 CANDU-6 657 30 Oct 1977 22 April 1983 [9]
Wolsong-2 CANDU-6 673 22 June 1992 1 July 1997 [10]
Wolsong-3 CANDU-6 686 17 March 1994 1 July 1998 [11]
Wolsong-4 CANDU-6 694 22 July 1994 1 Oct 1999 [12]
Phase II
Shin-Wolsong-1 OPR-1000 997 20 Nov 2007 31 July 2012 [13]
Shin-Wolsong-2 OPR-1000 960 23 Sept 2008 –– [14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Korea, Republic of". Power Reactor Information System (PRIS). International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  2. ^ a b (in Korean) 경주시의 산업·교통 (Industry and Transportation of Gyeongju) Nate / Encyclopedia of Korean Culture
  3. ^ (Sep 10, 2007) ATS wins South Korea nuclear deal TheStar.com / Canadian Press
  4. ^ "KHNP Fact Sheet". CANDU Owners Group website. Retrieved August 31, 2009.  See also site.
  5. ^ Wolseong Nuclear Power plant Korea Neclear Energy Foundation
  6. ^ Matthew L. Wald, (January 10, 1991) TALKING DEALS; Help for Canada's Nuclear Industry The New York Times
  7. ^ "New component issues idle Korean reactors". World Nuclear News. 28 May 2013. Retrieved 7 June 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "Shin Wolsong 2 fuel loading completed". World Nuclear News. 21 November 2014. Retrieved 24 November 2014. 
  9. ^ "Wolsong-1". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013. 
  10. ^ "Wolsong-2". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013. 
  11. ^ "Wolsong-3". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013. 
  12. ^ "Wolsong-2". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013. 
  13. ^ "Shin-Wolsong-1". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013. 
  14. ^ "Shin-Wolsong-2". PRIS. IAEA. 8 June 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2013. 

External links[edit]