Wolverhampton Grammar School

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Wolverhampton Grammar School
Big School.jpg
Established 1512
Type Independent day school
Headteacher Mrs Kathy Crewe-Read
Founder Sir Stephen Jenyns
Location Compton Road
Wolverhampton
West Midlands
WV3 9RB
England
Local authority Wolverhampton
DfE URN 104411 Tables
Students 726
Gender Coeducational
Ages 7–18
Former pupils Old Wulfrunians
Website wolverhamptongrammarschool.com

Wolverhampton Grammar School is a co-educational independent school located in the city of Wolverhampton.

History[edit]

Initially Wolverhampton Boys Grammar School, it was founded in 1512 by Sir Stephen Jenyns, a master of the ancient guild of Merchant Taylors, who was also Lord Mayor of London in the year of Henry VIII's coronation. Jenyns was born in the city of Wolverhampton circa 1448.

In 1875, the school moved to its present site on the Compton Road from its previous site on John Street in the centre of Wolverhampton. This move was overseen by the Chairman of Governors, Sir Rupert Kettle.

In September 1984, after 472 years as an all-boys school, the school admitted girls to the sixth form and in other embraces of modernity was the largest single user of assisted places funds, with over 40% of pupils in the 1980s and early 1990s reliant upon assisted places funding. This resulted in the school adopting its current name of Wolverhampton Grammar School.

In September 1992, the school became fully co-educational, admitting girls from the age of 11, a move seen as somewhat controversial at the time; however, other mixed grammar schools had existed for many years previously, while other single sex grammar schools had merged to continue as mixed grammar schools or mixed comprehensives. Unusually, Wolverhampton Girls High School has remained in existence alongside it, pressure for places at that school being eased by girls now being able to attend the grammar school. It has never been disclosed why the grammar school became mixed while the Girls High School has remained open as an all-girls school.

The current head, Kathy Crewe-Read who was appointed in September 2013, is the first female head in the school's 500 year history . Replacing Vincent Darby who retired after five years in post, Kathy Crewe-Read studied Pure Mathematics at Aberystwyth University. Prior to joining WGS, Kathy was Senior Deputy at The King’s School, Chester. She has also taught at King William’s College Isle of Man, St Swithun’s School Winchester and Yarm School in Yorkshire.

Over recent years the school has undergone development to improve facilities available to pupils. This included construction of a rock climbing wall, which replaced an Eton Fives court behind the sports centre. A new large extension to the music block was also completed in 2005, and officially opened by Robert Plant. In December 2007, a new block for the arts was opened on Merridale Lane, beyond Moreton's Piece, with a production of As You Like It and an exhibition by artist in residence, Derek Jones. It houses a number of art classrooms on two storeys, a gallery space (The Viner Gallery) and a 150-200 seat studio theatre (The Hutton Theatre, named after the late headmaster Patrick Hutton), a versatile performance space with extensive technical facilities. The last addition was a two storey extension to the school's Derry dining hall which provided a superb viewing pavilion overlooking the sports fields as well as teaching and learning spaces across the two floors.

In September 2011 Wolverhampton Grammar Junior School (WGJS) was opened on the school site, adding Year 3, 4 and 5. The old art block has subsequently been converted into a new languages suite and the former languages building, the Hallmark - is now the junior school. The new school is led by Mr Andrew Hymer.

The school marked its 500th anniversary in 2012 and as part of the celebrations hosted a gala dinner for 500 Old Wulfrunians (alumni) in a marquee in the school grounds and launched a Qunincentenary campaign to fundraise for buildings and bursaries.

Notable alumni (Old Wulfrunians)[edit]

References[edit]

  • Gerald Poynton Mander, The History of the Wolverhampton Grammar School (Wolverhampton: Steens, 1913)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 52°35′10″N 2°09′00″W / 52.586°N 2.150°W / 52.586; -2.150