National Organization for Women Woman of Courage Award winners

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Since 1994, the National Organization for Women (NOW) has presented the Woman of Courage Award annually (in most years) at the National NOW Conference, and periodically at issue-based summits organized by NOW and/or the NOW Foundation. Honorees are chosen for having demonstrated personal bravery in challenging entrenched power and in carrying out action that has the potential to benefit women in general.

Recipients of this award have been plaintiffs in lawsuits that challenged sex-based discrimination and pervasive sexual harassment. They have also been leaders who organized other women to promote better working conditions and opportunities in non-traditional careers, such as New York firefighter Capt. Brenda Berkman. An awardee may be an individual who brought attention to an important issue through her own experience, such as Christy Brzonkala. After being raped by two football players at Virginia Tech, Brzonkala sued the university, and her case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Another honoree was a young woman, Julia Gabriel, who took action to improve labor conditions by testifying against those who force illegal servitude. In a highly publicized case, future awardee Lilly Ledbetter took her case against sex-based pay discrimination by Goodyear Tire and Rubber to the Supreme Court at great personal cost. NOW also presents the Woman of Courage Award to women who have accomplished special or unique feats undertaken by few others, such as Barbara Hillary, who reached the North Pole at the age of 75.

Year Winner Occupation
2014 Ruslana Lyzhichko [1] Singer, social activist
2011 Nancy Hogshead-Makar [2] Title IX advocate, Olympic athlete (1984)
2009 Susan Hill[3] Abortion rights activist
2008 Barbra Hillary [4] Nurse, Traveler
2008 Lilly Ledbetter [5] Activist against wage discrimination
2006 Dr. Susan Wood[6] Former Assistant Commissioner for Women's Health and Director of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Women's Health
2006 Ani DiFranco [7] Singer, Songwriter, Vocalist, Guitarist, Activist
2005 Tillie Black Bear [8] Founder of the first shelter for women of color
2005 Sybil Niden Goldrich [9] Advocate for women on silicone breast implants
2005 Kakenya Ntaiya [10] Educating African women
2005 Katie Hnida [11] Footballer
2004 Dr. Donna J. Nelson [12] Professor of organic chemistry, University of Oklahoma; Nelson Diversity Surveys author
2004 Carol Moseley Braun[13] United States Senator (1992–98) and U.S. Ambassador (1999–2001)
2003 Barbara Lee[14] U.S. Representative (D-Calif.)
2002 Captain Brenda Berkman [15] Firefighter
2002 JoDee Flockhart [16] Advocate against sexual harassment in workplace
2001 Cheryl Haworth [17] Olympic weightlifter
2001 Maryanne Connelly[18] Feminist politician, former mayor of Fanwood, NJ
2000 Christy Brzonkala[19] First person in U.S. to sue her attackers under the Violence Against Women Act
2000 Elaine Gordon [20] Trail-blazing legislator
2000 Julia Gabriel [21] Activist against forced labor
1999 Martina Pickett [22] Advocate for safe and just workplace
1999 Tapestry of Polygamy [23] Group of women against the abuse of women and girls in illegal polygamous marriages
1999 Del Martin[24] Lesbian rights activist (married to Phyllis Lyon)
1999 Phyllis Lyon [25] Lesbian rights activist (married to Del Martin)
1998 Sylvia Smith and the Tonawanda NOW chapter [26] Native American rights activist
1997 Smith Barney Suit [27] Class-action sexual harassment and discrimination suit against Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, LLC.
1997 Judge Lanier Suit [28] Supreme Court sexual assault case against Chancery Court Judge David Lanier in United States v. Lanier
1997 Mitsubishi Suit [29] Lawsuit against Mitsubishi plant in Normal, Ill., for discrimination, verbal and physical abuse
1996 Mimi Ramsey [30] Founder of FORWARD International, a group that opposes female genital mutilation
1996 Claudia Crown Ades [31] Reproductive rights activist
1996 Rachel Bauchman [32] Young feminist
1995 Shannon Faulkner[33] First female member of the Corps of Cadets
1995 Merari Ortiz [34] Then 10-year-old welfare rights activist
1994 Lisa Tiger[35] Native American AIDS activist
1994 Dolores Huerta [36] Co-founder of the United Farm Workers (UFW)
1994 Fay Clayton[37] Chicago attorney who successfully argued NOW v. Scheidler
1994 Dr. Susan Wicklund [38] Reproductive Justice advocate

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ruslana - Woman of Courage, International Pop Star, Former Ukraine Parliament Member and EuroMaidan Protest Leader - to Discuss Current Crisis at National Press Club". Yahoo News. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  2. ^ "2011 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-30. 
  3. ^ "2009 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  4. ^ "2008 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  5. ^ "2008 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  6. ^ "2006 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  7. ^ "2006 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  8. ^ "2005 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  9. ^ "2005 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  10. ^ "2005 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  11. ^ "2005 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  12. ^ "2004 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  13. ^ "2004 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  14. ^ "2003 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  15. ^ "2002 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  16. ^ "2002 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  17. ^ "2001 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  18. ^ "2001 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  19. ^ "2000 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  20. ^ "2000 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  21. ^ "2000 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  22. ^ "1999 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  23. ^ "1999 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  24. ^ "NOW Article". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  25. ^ "NOW Article". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  26. ^ "1999 Women of Color and Allies Summit". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  27. ^ "1997 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  28. ^ "1997 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  29. ^ "1997 NOW National Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  30. ^ "Highlights of NOW 30th Anniversary Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  31. ^ "Highlights of NOW 30th Anniversary Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  32. ^ "Highlights of NOW 30th Anniversary Conference". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  33. ^ "National NOW Times article, Aug. 1995". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  34. ^ "National NOW Times article, Aug. 1995". National Organization for Women. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  35. ^ "1994 National NOW Conference". 
  36. ^ "1994 National NOW Conference". 
  37. ^ "1994 National NOW Conference". 
  38. ^ "1994 National NOW Conference".