Women's World Chess Championship 1939

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The 7th Women's World Chess Championship took place during the 1939 Buenos Aires Olympiad. The final results were as follows:[1][2][3][4]

Player 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Points
1  Vera Menchik (United Kingdom) - 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 18
2  Sonja Graf (Germany) 0 - 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 16
3  Berna Carrasco (Chile) 0 1 - 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 15½
4  Elfriede Rinder (Germany) 0 0 1 - 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 15
5  Mona May Karff (United States) 0 1 0 0 - 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 14
6  Milda Lauberte (Latvia) ½ 0 0 ½ 0 - 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 12
7  María Teresa Mora (Cuba) 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 11
8  Catharina Roodzant (Netherlands) 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 - ½ 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 11
9  Blažena Janečková (Bohemia and Moravia) 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 ½ - ½ 1 1 1 ½ 0 1 1 0 1 9
10  Paulette Schwartzmann (France) ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ - ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 9
11  Ingrid Larsen (Denmark) 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ - ½ 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1
12  Dora Trepat de Navarro (Argentina) 0 0 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ - ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 8
13  Ingeborg Andersson (Sweden) 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 0 ½ - ½ ½ 1 1 1 1 1
14  Salome Reischer (Palestine) 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ - 1 1 1 0 1 1 7
15  María Berea de Montero (Argentina) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 - 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 7
16  Marianne Stoffels (Belgium) 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 0 0 0 - 1 1 ½ ½ 7
17  María A. de Vigil (Uruguay) 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 1 ½ 0 0 ½ 0 - 0 ½ 1 6
18  Elena Raclauskiene (Lithuania) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 - ½ 1
19  Ruth Bloch Nakkerud (Norway) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ - 0 3
20  Anabelle Lougheed (Canada) 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 - 2

Sonja Graf traveled to Buenos Aires to play on the German team for the 8th Chess Olympiad. As a result of her outspoken defiance of Hitler's government, she was taken off the list of German participants and took the option of playing in the women's tournament under "Liberty", the international flag.

Graf and Paulette Schwartzmann, along with a large number of the male players, chose to stay in South America, as World War II broke out during the tournament.

Due to the outbreak of war, the women's championship wouldn't be put on the line for the next ten years. Meanwhile, Menchik died in England in 1944 in a German air raid, so the next championship in 1949-50 had to determine a new champion.

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