Women in the British Indian Ocean Territory

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Women in the British Indian Ocean Territory who are properly known as Chagossian women,[1] Îlois women, or women of Chagos Islands, were the native inhabitants of the British Indian Ocean Territory (Chagos Archipelago). They were among the people who once was described in the 1950s as islanders who, along with Chagossian men, were "born and brought up on the islands".[2] Their status as "native people" of the Chagos Islands was recognized by the United Nations, and they were living on the archipelago since 1776, being descendants of African slaves brought to the islands from Mauritius in 1786 by the French.[3] Others arrived as fishermen, farmers, and coconut plantation workers during the 19th century. Apart from having mostly African ancestry, particularly coming from Madagascar, Mozambique and other African nations including Mauritius, other Chagossian women also have a significant proportion of Indian and Malay ancestry.[4][full citation needed]

Notable women[edit]

Notable women from the Chagos Archipelago are Lisette Talate and Charlesia Alexis.[5][6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vine, David. Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military Base on Diego Garcia
  2. ^ Chagos Islands, Intervention and Exploitation: US and UK Government International Actions Since 1945
  3. ^ Chagossians reclaim our land: people evicted by the UK, land leased to the US military
  4. ^ QUEEN’S SPEECH HOUSE OF LORDS DEBATE, The UK Chagos Support Association, chagossupport.org
  5. ^ A SORROWFUL YEAR FOR THE CHAGOSSIAN COMMUNITY: Charlesia Alexis said farewell to the world on a cold morning yesterday, LeMauricien.com
  6. ^ Evers, Sandra and Marry Kooy (editors). Charlesia Alexis: The Struggle of the Chagossian Women, Eviction from the Chagos Islands: Displacement and Struggle for Identity]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]