Wong How Man

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Wong How Man (born 1949) is an explorer and photojournalist from Hong Kong, and founder and president of the China Exploration & Research Society (CERS), a preeminent nonprofit organization specializing in exploration, research, conservation and education in remote China. Between 1974, when he began exploring China as a journalist, and 1986, when he founded CERS, Wong led six major expeditions for the National Geographic magazine. His writing for the National Geographic was nominated for the Overseas Press Club Award of America. In his 1985 National Geographic expedition, Wong led a team that found a new source of the Yangtze River that is internationally recognized as the true geographic source of the river. Wong documented this expedition in his 1989 book, Exploring the Yangtze: China's Longest River.[1] Twenty years later, Wong led a team to discover a new source, four miles west of the source that he had previously discovered.[2] Subsequently, Wong led CERS expeditions that pinpointed the source of the Mekong in 2007 and discovered a new source for the Yellow River in 2008. In 2011, he and his team defined the source of the Salween River.

Wong has authored over a dozen books. Among these, From Manchuria to Tibet won the prestigious Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism Gold Award in 1999.[3] His book Islamic Frontiers of China[4] was published in the UK in 1990, long before the topic became of worldwide interest. His two CD-ROMs, Exploring the Yangtze and Tibet, won 11 and 5 international awards respectively.

Wong's organization, CERS, has conducted scores of successful conservation projects, many of which became full-length documentary films. Wong is often invited as keynote speaker on important international lecture circuits for both corporations and select groups of audience. Many heads of State and elites of society have been among his audience. His work is supported by private foundations, individuals and corporations. Wong has received numerous awards, including an honorary doctorate from the University of Wisconsin in River Falls, Lifetime Achievement Award from Monk Hsing Yun. In 2002, Time named Wong as one of 25 Asians profiled in its special issue on "Asian Heroes."[5]

Bibliography[edit]

Wong How Man, Exploring the Yangtze: China's Longest River (China Books & Periodicals, 1989), ISBN 0-8351-2185-2
Wong How Man, Islamic Frontiers of China (Scorpion Publishing, 1990), ISBN 0-905906-83-7
Wong How Man, From Manchuria to Tibet (Odyssey Publishing, 1998), ISBN 962-217-098-6
Wong How Man, Closer to Heaven - An Exploration Series (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2001), ISBN 957-621-906-X
Wong How Man, Closer to Earth - An Exploration Series (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2001), ISBN 957-621-907-X
Wong How Man, Black-necked Crane Rendezvous (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2002), ISBN 986-417-045-7
Wong How Man, Nature at Heart (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2003), ISBN 986-417-191-7
Wong How Man, Culture at Heart (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2003), ISBN 986-417-192-5
Wong How Man, Holy Mountain, Hidden Valley (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2007), ISBN 978-986-216-024-4
Wong How Man, Voyage of Discovery (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2007), ISBN 978-986-216-025-1
Wong How Man, As River Flows (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2009), ISBN 978-986-216-439-6
Wong How Man, Tales from Ancient Kingdom (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2009), ISBN 978-986-216-440-2
Wong How Man, Treasures in Our Midst (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2010), ISBN 978-986-216-629-1
Wong How Man, Heritage on Our Minds (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2010), ISBN 978-986-216-630-1
Wong How Man, Adel Awni Dajani, Islamic Frontiers of China: Peoples of the Silk Road (I.B.Tauris Publishers, 2010), ISBN 978-1-84885-702-5
Wong How Man, Nature As My Companion (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2012), ISBN 978-986-320-052-9
Wong How Man, Culture As My Friend (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2012), ISBN 978-986-320-058-1
Wong How Man, Boundless Nature (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2013), ISBN 978-986-320-363-6
Wong How Man, Borderless Culture (Commonwealth Publishing Group, 2013), ISBN 978-986-320-364-3

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wong How Man, Exploring the Yangtze: China's Longest River (China Books & Periodicals, 1989), ISBN 0-8351-2185-2
  2. ^ Team claims to find new Yangtze source, usatoday.com
  3. ^ Wong How Man, From Manchuria to Tibet (Odyssey Publishing, 1998), ISBN 962-217-098-6
  4. ^ Wong How Man, Islamic Frontiers of China (Scorpion Publishing, 1990), ISBN 0-905906-83-7
  5. ^ Susan Jakes, "Leaving It Better Than He Found It."