Woodburn, Indiana

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Woodburn, Indiana
City
Location in the state of Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Coordinates: 41°7′34″N 84°51′10″W / 41.12611°N 84.85278°W / 41.12611; -84.85278Coordinates: 41°7′34″N 84°51′10″W / 41.12611°N 84.85278°W / 41.12611; -84.85278
Country United States
State Indiana
County Allen
Township Maumee
Government
 • Mayor Richard A. Hoeppner (D)
Area[1]
 • Total 0.93 sq mi (2.41 km2)
 • Land 0.93 sq mi (2.41 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation 751 ft (229 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,520
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,581
 • Density 1,634.4/sq mi (631.0/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 46797
Area code(s) 260
FIPS code 18-85184[4]
GNIS feature ID 0446280[5]

Woodburn is a city in Maumee Township, Allen County, Indiana, United States. The population was 1,579 at the 2000 census, making it the second smallest city in the state, after Cannelton. The population was 1,520 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Woodburn is located at 41°7′34″N 84°51′10″W / 41.12611°N 84.85278°W / 41.12611; -84.85278 (41.126074, -84.852724).[6]

According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 0.93 square miles (2.4 km2), all land.[1]

Woodburn is located adjacent to U.S. Route 24. In 1989, a group of Indiana and Ohio residents met in Woodburn to form the Fort to Port Improvement Organization to lobby for expansion of the highway between Fort Wayne, Indiana and Toledo, Ohio. The meeting was organized by State Representative Mitch Harper.

History[edit]

In 1865 Joseph Edgerton and Joseph Smith platted the town of Woodburn, or Phelps Station as it was called at that time.[7] The two men chose this area due to the abundant timber, fertile ground, and nearby river. After two large, accidental fires in the area Joseph Edgerton sent his son Edward Edgerton to Woodburn to sell off large tracts of land for farming.

This area was first known as Phelps Station due to the train depot. There were five families and a Post Office. In September 1865 the town was again platted with the name Woodburn due to the enormous wood burnings to clear the land. In 1895 a group of local men decided to incorporate the town into Shirley City in honor of Senator Robert B Shirley.

Once again in 1956 a special meeting was called where the decision was made to return the name to Woodburn and officially become the smallest 5th class city in Indiana. The hard working pioneers who migrated to this area are to be commended for clearing the land for cultivation and implementing the drainage system. This cleared the way for commerce in the city.

The Stucky brothers started their business in Woodburn selling farm implements and repair. The grain elevator and train station were the leading businesses in the early days.Soon the small city became self-contained with everything from a bank, to grocery stores, drug store, furniture, doctors, blacksmith, restaurants, taverns, stockyard, hotel, butcher shop, brick and tile mill, automobiles, schools and churches.

Due to limited roads and abundant local business, community members did not have to travel outside of Woodburn for their basic needs.[8]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,520 people, 585 households, and 406 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,634.4 inhabitants per square mile (631.0/km2). There were 633 housing units at an average density of 680.6 per square mile (262.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.6% White, 0.2% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 585 households of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.6% were non-families. 23.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.12.

The median age in the city was 32.9 years. 28% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.9% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 10.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.9% male and 49.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,579 people, 583 households, and 432 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,720.5 people per square mile (662.7/km²). There were 609 housing units at an average density of 663.6 per square mile (255.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.42% White, 0.13% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.51% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.96% of the population.

There were 583 households out of which 43.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.2% were married couples living together, 14.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the city the population was spread out with 32.9% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 17.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 99.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $40,833, and the median income for a family was $45,781. Males had a median income of $34,091 versus $23,571 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,061. About 4.9% of families and 5.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.9% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Places: Indiana". 2010 Census Gazetteer Files. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-04-21. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Griswold, Bert Joseph; Taylor, Mrs. Samuel R. (1917). The Pictorial History of Fort Wayne, Indiana: A Review of Two Centuries of Occupation of the Region about the Head of the Maumee River. Robert O. Law Company. p. 678. 
  8. ^ Gaylen Stetler of the Woodburn Historical Society. References: Home Community U.S.A. and Bringing Back the Good Old Days

External links[edit]