Woodlawn Cemetery (Detroit, Michigan)

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Woodlawn Mausoleum

Woodlawn Cemetery is a cemetery located at 19975 Woodward Avenue, opposite the Michigan State Fairgrounds, between 7 Mile Road and 8 Mile Road, in Detroit, Michigan.

History[edit]

The cemetery was established in 1895 and immediately attracted some of the most notable names in the city.[1] The grounds encompass 140 acres (57 ha) and were planned by civil engineer Mason L. Brown and horticulturalist Frank Eurich. At the time of the first burial in 1896, Woodlawn was outside the city limits. Eurich also developed Woodlawn Cemetery in Toledo.[2]

Notable burials[edit]

Dodge Brothers Mausoleum
Haass Monument by Charles Keck

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Our Heritage". Woodlawn Cemetery Detroit. Retrieved December 21, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c A. Dale Northup (2003). Detroit's Woodlawn Cemetery. Arcadia Press. p. 14. ISBN 0-7385-3156-1. Retrieved 2011-04-22. 
  3. ^ "Index to Politicians-Chandless to Chapline". www.politicalgraveyard.com. 5 October 2010. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  4. ^ "Index to Politicians: Cobb-hunter to Cochlin". The Political Graveyard. 5 October 2010. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  5. ^ "Howard A. Coffin". Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  6. ^ "James Couzens". Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  7. ^ a b Michael W. Skinner. "The Dodge Family and the Grosse Pointes". Grosse Pointe Historical Society. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  8. ^ "George Duffield, Jr". findagrave.com. 29 January 2002. Retrieved 2011-04-05. 
  9. ^ "Homer S. Ferguson". Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  10. ^ "Edsel Ford". Answers.com. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  11. ^ Curtis Jackson (27 January 1999). "Rev. C L Franklin". FindaGrave.com. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  12. ^ "Alex Groesbeck and M-97". Macomb County Historical Commission. 22 March 2011. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f "Detroit History Tour: Woodlawn Cemetery". The Night Train. 18 March 2010. Retrieved 2011-04-05. 
  14. ^ Zena Simmons (13 September 1007). "Detroit's Flamboyant Prophet Jones". The Detroit News. Retrieved 2012-04-04. 
  15. ^ "Alfred Lucking". Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  16. ^ "Arthur Edison Blair Moody". Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  17. ^ Sharon Sikle Carty (3 November 2005). "Parks' funeral looks forward as well as back". USA Today. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  18. ^ "Carl May Weideman". Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress. Retrieved 2011-04-04. 
  19. ^ "Richard Storrs Willis". CyberHymnal. 2011. Retrieved 2011-07-20. 
  20. ^ "Casualty Details: Haldane, David". CWGC. 25 June 1919. Retrieved 2014-02-26. 

Sources[edit]

  • Kvaran, Einar Einarsson, Cemetery Sculpture in America, unpublished manuscript
  • Nawrocki, Dennis Alan and Thomas J. Holleman, Art in Detroit Public Places, Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Michigan, 1980
  • Northup, A. Dale, Detroit's Woodlawn Cemetery, Arcadia Publishing, 2003

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 42°26′31″N 83°07′34″W / 42.4419°N 83.1261°W / 42.4419; -83.1261