Woods Fund of Chicago

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The Woods Fund of Chicago is a private independent foundation in Chicago, whose goal is to increase opportunities for less-advantaged people and communities in the Chicago metropolitan area, including the opportunity to shape decisions affecting them.

The Woods Charitable Fund was incorporated in Nebraska in 1941 by Frank Henry Woods, Sr. (1868–1952) and Nelle Cochrane Woods (1870–1950) of Lincoln, Nebraska and their three sons: Thomas Cochrane Woods, Sr. (1895–1958) of Lincoln, and Henry Cochrane Woods, Sr. (1895–1968) and Frank Henry Woods, Jr. (1905–1980) of Chicago, and operated in both Lincoln and Chicago for 53 years through 1993, when the Woods Charitable Fund was reorganized into two separate foundations, with separate officers, boards of directors, and staff.[1][2]

The Woods Fund of Chicago was incorporated in Illinois on November 15, 1993, and effective January 1, 1994 was allocated 70% of the market value of the assets of the Woods Charitable Fund and began operation and continued the Fund's philanthropy in Chicago, while the Woods Charitable Fund continued its philanthropy in Lincoln.[1][2]

The principal for the foundation came from business interests in the Lincoln Telephone & Telegraph Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska, the Sahara Coal Co. headquartered in Chicago with mines in Saline County in far Southern Illinois, and Addressograph-Multigraph Corp. of Cleveland, Ohio.[1][2]

In 2004, the Woods Fund of Chicago was the 43rd largest foundation in Illinois by total assets with assets of $67,304,215.[3]

Mission Statement[edit]

The fund describes itself as "a grantmaking foundation whose goal is to increase opportunities for less advantaged people and communities in the metropolitan area, including the opportunity to shape decisions affecting them. The foundation works primarily as a funding partner with nonprofit organizations. Woods supports nonprofits in their important roles of engaging people in civic life, addressing the causes of poverty and other challenges facing the region, promoting more effective public policies, reducing racism and other barriers to equal opportunity, and building a sense of community and common ground."[4]

Finances[edit]

In its 2006 annual report, the fund said it had made $3.1 million in grants to more than 70 local organizations. At the time, the fund had $58 million in assets.[5]

Presidents and Directors[edit]

Woods Charitable Fund[edit]

  • President:
    • Frank Henry Woods, Sr. (1941–1952)
    • Thomas Cochrane Woods, Jr. (1952–1958)
    • Henry Cochrane Woods, Sr. (1958–1968)
    • Thomas Cochrane Woods, Jr. (1968–1989)
    • Lucia Woods Lindley (1990–1993)
    • Thomas Cochrane Woods, III (1993–2000)
    • Thomas D. Potter (2001–2002)
    • Stephen S. Sands (2003–2004)
    • Michael J. Tavlin (2005–2006)
    • Donna Wiemann Woods (2007– )
  • Executive Director: Jean Rudd (1980–1993), Pam Baker (1994– )
  • Board of Directors, 1993:[1]
    • Lucia Woods Lindley - (Director 1980–1993) - President (1990–1993), Woods Charitable Fund; co-founder, Chicago Foundation for Women; founder, The Sophia Fund; photographer; daughter of Frank Henry Woods, Jr.[6]
    • George Kelm - (Director 1968–1996) - Chairman (1992–1994), former President & CEO (1978–1992), Sahara Enterprises, Inc.; former Associate (1954–1963), Partner (1964–1972), Managing Partner (1973–1978), Hopkins & Sutter; former Vice President, Woods Charitable Fund (1978–1993)[7]
    • Mary Decker - (Director 1991–1994) - Director (1991–1994), Cook County Office of Capital Planning and Policy; Senior Vice President for community relations and reinvestment activities, First Chicago Bank (1994–1995), First Chicago NBD (1995–1998), Banc One (1998– ); former Executive Director (1985–1990), Metropolitan Planning Council; winner (1989), Crain's Chicago Business "40 Under 40" award; former Executive Director (1978–1985), Friends of the Parks[8]
    • Charles N. Wheatley - (Director 1993– ) - President & CEO (1992– ), former Vice President & Secretary (1985–1992) Sahara Enterprises, Inc.; Vice President (1994–1996), Woods Fund of Chicago
    • Thomas Cochrane Woods III - (Director 1980–2000) - Chairman (1993–1999), Lincoln Telecommunications; President (1993–2000), former Vice President (1989–1993), Woods Charitable Fund; son of Thomas Cochrane Woods, Jr.[9]
    • Sydney D. Beane - (Director 1990-1995) - Western Regional Director (1993– ), Center for Community Change; former Executive Director (1983–1993), Lincoln Indian Center (1983–1993); former Assistant Professor and Director of American Indian Projects (1980–1983), School of Social Work, Arizona State University
    • Marie Fischer - (Director 1991-1996) - Trainer, The Grantsmanship Center; Professor Emeritus, Department of Community and Regional Planning, College of Architecture, University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Woods Fund of Chicago[edit]

  • President:
    • George Kelm (1994–1996)
    • Jean Rudd (1997–2000)
    • Ricardo A. Millett (2001–2005)
    • Deborah Harrington (2006–2009)
    • Laura S. Washington (2010- )
  • Executive Director: Jean Rudd (1980–1996)
  • Board of Directors, 1994:[1]
    • George Kelm - (Director 1968–1996)
    • Mary Decker - (Director 1991–1994)
    • Charles N. Wheatley - (Director 1993– )
    • Barack Obama - (Director 1994–2002) - Associate (1993–1996), Of counsel (1997–2004), Davis, Miner, Barnhill & Galland; Lecturer (1992–1996), Senior Lecturer (1996–2004), University of Chicago Law School; Illinois State Senator (1997–2004); winner (1993), Crain's Chicago Business "40 Under 40" award; former President (1990–1991), Harvard Law Review; former Executive Director (1985–1988), Developing Communities Project[10]
    • Howard J. Stanback - (Director 1994–2005) - Executive Vice President (1989–1992, 1994–1997), Airport Resources Partners (ARP) Inc.; Manager (1998–2002), New Kenwood, LLC; President & CEO (2002–2005), Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities; former City Manager (1992–1993), Hartford, Connecticut; former Commissioner (1988–1989), Chicago Department of Aviation; former Administrative Assistant (1987–1988) to Chicago Mayors Washington and Sawyer; former Deputy Director for Strategic Planning (1985–1987), Chicago Office of Employment and Training; former Assistant Professor of Economics (1981–1985), New School for Social Research[11]
  • Board of Directors, 2008:[17]
    • Charles N. Wheatley - (Director 1993– )
    • William C. Ayers - (Director 1999– ) - Distinguished Professor of Education, University of Illinois at Chicago
    • Laura S. Washington - (Director 2003– ) - Ida B. Wells-Barnett University Professor and Fellow of the DePaul Humanities Center
    • Jesus G. Garcia - (Director 2003– ) - Executive Director, Little Village Community Development Corporation[18]
    • Doris Salomón Chagin - (Director 2005– ) - Community Affairs Director, Midwest US, BP America Inc.
    • Lee Bey - (Director 2006– ) - Executive Director (2007– ), Chicago Central Area Committee; former Director of Media and Governmental Affairs (2004–2006), Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill LLP
    • Beth E. Richie - (Director 2006– ) - Professor and Head of the Department of African American Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago
    • Patrick M. Sheahan - (Director 2008– ) - Executive Director, Public Affairs, UBS Investment Bank
  • Board Chair:
    • Charles N. Wheatley (1997)
    • Barack Obama (1998)
    • Howard J. Stanback (1999–2002)
    • Maria G. Valdez (2003–2004)
    • William C. Ayers (2005–2006)
    • Laura S. Washington (2007–2009)
    • Jesus G. Garcia (2010- )
  • Board Vice Chair:
    • Barack Obama (1997)
    • Howard J. Stanback (1998)
    • Maria G. Valdez (1999–2002)
    • William C. Ayers (2003–2004)
    • Laura S. Washington (2005–2006)
    • Jesus G. Garcia (2007–2009)
    • Doris Solomon (2010- )

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Woods Charitable Fund, Inc. (1993). A Report for the Year 1993. Woods Charitable Fund, Inc. OCLC 44552641. 
    Woods Charitable Fund, Inc. (1994). A Report for the Year 1994. Woods Charitable Fund, Inc. OCLC 44552641. 
    Woods Fund of Chicago (1994). 1994 Annual Report. Woods Fund of Chicago. OCLC 47959591. 
  2. ^ a b c Woods Fund of Chicago (2008). "History of the Fund". Woods Fund of Chicago. Retrieved 2008-10-31. 
    Woods Charitable Fund (2008). "History". Woods Charitable Fund. Retrieved 2008-10-31. 
  3. ^ Donors Forum of Chicago (2006). "50 Largest Foundations by Total Assets and Grants". The Directory of Illinois Foundations (9th edition ed.). Chicago: Donors Forum of Chicago. p. page ix. OCLC 15465359. 
  4. ^ Woods Fund of Chicago
  5. ^ Woods Fund of Chicago 2006 Annual Report
  6. ^ Artner, Alan G. (April 13, 1975). "The cameras chronicle the worlds of Cather and color". Chicago Tribune. p. E2. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Burliegh, Nina (April 28, 1991). "Fund builds on a firm foundation". Chicago Tribune. p. 2 (Womanews). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    . (May 5, 1991). "Honoring Sophia's generosity". Chicago Tribune. p. 2 (Womanews). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Eng, Monica (November 16, 1999). "Chicago foundation harnesses the giving power of women for women". Chicago Tribune. p. 1 (Tempo). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Richards, Cindy (September 20, 2000). "Raising the bar on giving; Philanthropic group helps women gain power over money". Chicago Tribune. p. 3 (Woman News). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  7. ^ Kelm, George (April 27, 1986). "Acid rain and the Illinois economy". Chicago Tribune. p. D2. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Breslin, Meg McSherry (December 19, 1998). "George Kelm, advocate for kids, families". Chicago Tribune. p. 23. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Southwell, David (December 22, 1998). "George Kelm, 70, lawyer". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 62. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    . (December 24, 1998). "Obituaries; George Kelm". Deerfield Review. p. 141. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  8. ^ Brodt, Bonita (May 15, 1980). "4-year-old group refuses to give up on bad areas". Chicago Tribune. p. A1 (West). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Carr, Rebecca (October 9–October 15, 1989). "40 under 40: Mary Decker, Executive director, Metropolitan Planning Council". Crain's Chicago Business. p. 30. 
    Wahl, Melissa (May 30, 1998). "Chicago banker, NU economist may be on short list for Fed seats; On rate policy, both seen as moderates". Chicago Tribune. p. 1 (Business). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Wahl, Melissa (November 23, 1998). "Chicago banker's prospects for Fed could be dimming; Specialization in community development could be working against the chances for nomination of a former official of First Chicago NBD". Chicago Tribune. p. 3 (Business). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Wahl, Melissa (February 7, 1999). "A dealmaker faces new challenge". Chicago Tribune. p. 7 (Business). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  9. ^ Reist, Margaret (May 6, 2000). "Foundation president dies after cancer battle". Lincoln Journal Star. p. B1. 
  10. ^ Anderson, Veronica (September 27–October 3, 1993). "40 under Forty: Barack Obama, Director, Illinois Project Vote". Crain's Chicago Business. p. 43. 
  11. ^ Green, Rick (April 21, 1992). "Hartford post goes to Stanback; Consultant wins race for city manager". The Hartford Courant. p. A1. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Green, Rick (April 26, 1992). "Stanback drawn to Hartford by potential for change; Council's view lured new Hartford manager". The Hartford Courant. p. A1. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Lipton, Eric; Gosselin, Kenneth R. (December 8, 1993). "Stanback resigns as city manager, receives settlement; Out-going official given $75,000". The Hartford Courant. p. C3. 
  12. ^ . (April 6, 2003). "People in the News: Appointments & Promotions". Philanthropy News Digest. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  13. ^ Palikuca, Seka P. (January 20, 1997). "People". Chicago Tribune. p. (Business). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    . (January 27, 1997). "Appointments". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 44. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  14. ^ Hinz, Greg (November 19, 2001). "40 under Forty: Maria Valdez, Senior Litigator, Mexican American Legal Defence and Educational Fund". Crain's Chicago Business. pp. E21–E22. 
    MALDEF (November 5, 2003). "MALDEF names Maria Valdez to head Chicago office". Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund. Retrieved 2008-11-02. [dead link]
    . (February 3, 2005). "2 lawyers are named as magistrate judges". Chicago Tribune. p. 3 (Metro). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  15. ^ Hirsley, Michael (September 23, 1994). "1st woman will lead seminary; McCormick board picks Kansas pastor". Chicago Tribune. p. 9 (Chicagoland). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Herguth, Bob (April 18, 1995). "Cynthia Campbell". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 35. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  16. ^ Briggs, Michael (February 16, 1990). "Women doing better, but blacks still stagnant, at law firms". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 41. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Martin, R. Eden (August 21, 1990). "Reflections on the human quality of David Souter". Chicago Tribune. p. 15 (Perspective). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Knowles, Francine (June 23, 1999). "Commercial Club names new officers". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 64. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Davis, Andy (June 23, 1999). "Influential civic group picks new leadership". Chicago Tribune. p. 1 (Business). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Greising, David (June 27, 1999). "If name escapes you, civic leader's job well done". Chicago Tribune. p. 1 (Business). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
    Manor, Robert (July 1, 1999). "Looking into area's future". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 6. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  17. ^ Woods Fund of Chicago (2008). "Staff & Board Directory". Woods Fund of Chicago. Retrieved 2008-11-02. 
  18. ^ . (December 30, 1998). "Senator named head of development group". Chicago Tribune. p. 3 (Metro). Retrieved 2008-11-02. 

External links[edit]