Woolworth Estate

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Woolworth Estate
Woolworth Estate is located in New York
Woolworth Estate
Location 77 Crescent Beach Rd., Glen Cove, New York
Coordinates 40°52′31″N 73°38′38″W / 40.87528°N 73.64389°W / 40.87528; -73.64389Coordinates: 40°52′31″N 73°38′38″W / 40.87528°N 73.64389°W / 40.87528; -73.64389
Area 16 acres (6.5 ha)
Built 1916
Architect Gilbert, Charles P.H.
Architectural style Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals, Italian Renaissance
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 79001593[1]
Added to NRHP May 17, 1979

Woolworth Estate is a historic estate located at Glen Cove in Nassau County, New York. It was designed in 1916 by noted architect C. P. H. Gilbert (1861-1952) for Frank Winfield Woolworth (1852-1919). The estate consists of the main residence, known as Winfield Hall; a large garage with remodeled living quarters; a main entrance arch; two greenhouses; and various landscape features including a tea house.

Winfield Hall[edit]

When his current home was destroyed by a mysterious fire, Woolworth immediately went to work on building Winfield Hall, the plans for which, serendipitously, were already drawn. With walls and pillars of marble, the house ended up costing nine million dollars, the grand staircase alone costing two million dollars.

The house is an Italian Renaissance style, marble covered residence with a five bay wide central mass and flanking four bay wide wings. It features a one bay central entrance portico and flat roof.[2] After the Woolworths moved on, the house sat empty for years, and was eventually purchased in 1929 by the wife of Richard S. Reynolds, of the R.S. Reynolds Metal Company fame. After her tenure, the house became the Grace Downs Academy, a business school for young ladies, then was purchased by Martin Carey, brother to former Governor Hugh Carey of New York.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.[1]

Paranormal Activities Reported At Winfield Hall[edit]

Winfield Hall, like many other Long Island Mansions, has a rather ominous history of being haunted.[3] It is said that on the evening of May 2, 1917, as Edna Woolworth Hutton, Franklin Woolworth's middle daughter, took her own life, in The Plaza Hotel, New York City, while her father, Franklin, was at Winfield Hall, hosting a party, a somewhat bizarre and unexplained incident occurred. Located above Winfield Hall's main entrance fireplace, the marble Family Crest, containing the painted faces of his three daughters, acquired a crack through the face of Edna,[4] leaving the two remaining faces, as well as the rest of the crest, untouched. A lightning bolt, the product of a severe thunderstorm, has been attributed in causing this crack. Shortly thereafter, stories of hearing strange noises in Winfield Hall, as well as reported observations of seeing a floating "spirit" wandering through the halls, began to circulate. Later on, when Winfield Hall was being used as a business school for women, there were numerous reports of hearing a woman crying,[5] in the locked "Marie Antoinette" room, rumored to be the room that Edna had committed suicide, though her obituary states her death occurred elsewhere. Other people have reported hearing organ music,[6] playing on its own, while detailed descriptions of seeing what appears to be the ghost of a young woman "haunting" the gardens, have also been noted.

References[edit]