Works of Harold Pinter

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Main article: Harold Pinter

Works of Harold Pinter provides a list of Harold Pinter's stage and television plays; awards and nominations for plays; radio plays; screenplays for films; awards and nominations for screenwriting; dramatic sketches; prose fiction; collected poetry; and awards for poetry. It augments a section of the main article on this author.

Stage and television plays[edit]

Awards and nominations for plays[edit]

Broadway[2]

Dramatic sketches[edit]

Radio plays[edit]

Screenplays for films[edit]

Awards and nominations for screenwriting[6][edit]

Prose fiction[edit]

  • "Kullus" (1949)
  • The Dwarfs (written from 1952–1956; rev. and first published 1990) (Novel)
  • "Latest Reports from the Stock Exchange" (1953)
  • "The Black and White" (1954–55)
  • "The Examination" (1955)
  • "Tea Party" (1963)
  • "The Coast" (1975)
  • "Problem" (1976)
  • "Lola" (1977)
  • "Short Story" (1995)
  • "Girls" (1995)
  • "Sorry About This" (1999)
  • "Tess" (2000)
  • "Voices in the Tunnel" (2001)
  • "The Mirror" (2007)

Collected poetry[edit]

  • Poems (1971)
  • I Know the Place (1977)
  • Poems and Prose 1949–1977 (1978)
  • Ten Early Poems (1990)
  • Collected Poems and Prose (1995)
  • "The Disappeared" and Other Poems (2002)
  • Poems by Harold Pinter Chosen by Antonia Fraser. Warwick: Greville Press Pamphlets, 2002. (Limited ed. of 300 copies, "of which the first fifty are numbered and signed by the selector.")
  • Six Poems for A. Warwick: Greville Press Pamphlets, 2007. ISBN 0-9555821-1-3 (10). ISBN 978-0-9555821-1-0 (13).

Anthologies and other collections[edit]

  • 99 Poems in Translation: An Anthology Selected by Harold Pinter, Anthony Astbury, & Geoffrey Godbert (1994)
  • 100 Poems by 100 Poets: An Anthology Selected by Harold Pinter, Anthony Astbury, & Geoffrey Godbert (1987; rpt. 1992)
  • 101 Poems Against War (2003). Eds. Matthew Hollis & Paul Kegan. Afterword Andrew Motion. (Incl. "American Football", by Harold Pinter [80].)
  • War (2003)
  • Various Voices: Prose, Poetry, Politics 1948–2005 (1998; rev. & updated, 2005)
  • Death etc. (2005)
  • The Essential Pinter (2006)
  • Various Voices: Sixty Years of Prose, Poetry, Politics 1948–2008 (1998 & 2005; rev. & updated, 2009)

Awards for poetry[edit]

Speeches[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ HaroldPinter.org lists this work as a "play", but it is actually a 4-page dramatic sketch; it lasts approximately eight to ten minutes in production. It was first produced as a "curtain raiser" for Death and the Maiden by Ariel Dorfman at the Royal Court Upstairs in London, in July 1991, which went on to Washington, D.C.; its production poster featured on HaroldPinter.org identifies it as a "sketch". "The New World Order" is also identified as a "sketch" in a review of the Royal Court première by Mel Gussow, "Critic's Notebook: On the London Stage, a Feast of Revenge, Menace and Guilt". Online posting. New York Times 31 July 1991. Recent productions and publications do refer to it more generically, as a "play", following the website's "Plays" section.
  2. ^ Harold Pinter at the Internet Broadway Database: "Harold Pinter Awards". Pinter was also nominated for the 1969 Tony Award Best Direction of a Play for his direction of Robert Shaw's The Man in the Glass Booth.
  3. ^ Harold Pinter's official site lists this in the section for "Prose – Fiction," but it was produced as a sketch on stage in a revue, according to Baker and Ross.
  4. ^ "Voices: Text by Harold Pinter and Music by James Clarke", Through the Night, BBC Radio 3, 10 Oct. 2005, 9:30–10:15 pm (UK), accessed 10 Oct. 2005 (live). (RealPlayer audio no longer accessible.) Repeated more recently, on 30 Dec. 2006; see BBC press office program information. Updated 23 Apr. 2007.
  5. ^ There are discrepancies between the IMDb release and award dates for this film and those provided in scholarly publications. Betrayal at the Internet Movie Database lists the film's release in New York as "19 February 1983" and its London release date as "October 1983." According to Steven H. Gale, however, in Sharp Cut: Harold Pinter's Screenplays and the Artistic Process (Lexington: UP of Kentucky, 2003), it was "Released" in both London and New York "in 1982" (256, 415). It was distributed by Twentieth-Century Fox International Classics and first screened in movie theaters in New York in "February 1983," according to Susan Hollis Merritt, Pinter in Play: Critical Strategies and the Plays of Harold Pinter (1990; Durham and London: Duke UP, 1995) 236, 300; the first film reviews of such New York commercial screenings cited by Merritt date from 20 February 1983 on (236–39). The film was nominated for 1983 Academy Awards for "Best Picture" and Pinter for "Writing" in the category "Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium" (Gale 256, 415); cf. Academy Awards Database, accessed 28 June 2007. The IMDb appears to be a year off in listing its Academy Award and BAFTA nominations as 1984 instead of 1983.
  6. ^ Steven H. Gale, "Appendix B: Honors and Awards for Screenwriting", in Sharp Cut: Harold Pinter's Screenplays and the Artistic Process (Lexington: UP of Kentucky, 2003).
  7. ^ "In recognition of Pinter's lifelong contribution to literature, 'and specifically for his collection of poetry entitled War, published in 2003.'"

Works cited[edit]

Further information: Bibliography for Harold Pinter
Baker, William, and John C. Ross, comps. Harold Pinter: A Bibliographical History. London: The British Library and New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll P, 2005. ISBN 1-58456-156-4 (10). ISBN 978-1-58456-156-9 (13). Print. "Oak Knoll Press Bestsellers", Spring – Summer 2007 Catalogue PDF (9.25 MB). Oak Knoll Press, 2007. Web. 2 Oct. 2007. (Page 37 of 40 pages.)
"Biobibliographical Notes" and "Bibliography" for "Harold Pinter, Nobel Prize in Literature 2005." In "Bio-bibliography". By The Swedish Academy. The Nobel Prize in Literature 2005. nobelprize.org. The Swedish Academy and The Nobel Foundation, Oct. 2005. Web. 6 Jan. 2009. (English HTML version.) [Additional PDF versions accessible in English, French, German, and Swedish via hyperlinks.]
Harold Pinter: An Inventory of His Collection at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (1960–1980). Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, 1999. Web. 5 Apr. 2009.
"Links: Libraries and Academia" and "Publications": "Works By" and "Works About" Pinter. haroldpinter.org. Harold Pinter, 2000–[2009]. Web. 18 Apr. 2009.
Merritt, Susan Hollis, comp. "Harold Pinter Bibliography". SusanHollisMerritt.org. Susan Hollis Merritt, 2009. Web. 18 Apr. 2009. (Webpage pertaining to the "Harold Pinter Bibliography" published in The Pinter Review. Tampa: U of Tampa P, 1987– .)
–––. "Harold Pinter Bibliography: 2000–2002." The Pinter Review: Collected Essays 2003 and 2004. Ed. Francis Gillen and Steven H. Gale. Tampa: U of Tampa P, 2004. 242–300. Print.
–––. "Harold Pinter Bibliography: 2002–2004 With a Special Supplement on the 2005 Nobel Prize in Literature, October 2005 – May 2006." The Pinter Review: Nobel Prize/Europe Theatre Prize Volume: 2005–2008. Ed. Francis Gillen with Steven H. Gale. Tampa: U of Tampa P, 2008. 261–343. Print.
The Pinter Review. Tampa: U of Tampa P, 1987– ). Ed. Francis Gillen and Steven H. Gale. HaroldPinter.org. Harold Pinter, 2000–[2008]. Web. 3 Jan. 2009. [Table of contents of past issues, retyped on index Webpage; occasional typographical variations.]
The Pinter Review: Nobel Prize/Europe Theatre Prize Volume: 2005–2008. Ed. Francis Gillen with Steven H. Gale. Tampa: U of Tampa P, 2008. ISBN 978-1-879852-19-8 (hardcover). ISBN 978-1-879852-20-4 (softcover). ISSN 08959706. Print.

External links[edit]