World's Largest Cedar Bucket

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The bucket after the 2005 fire

The World's Largest Cedar Bucket is a 1,556 imperial gallons (7,070 l) red cedar bucket.[1] The bucket is approximately 6 feet (1.8 m) tall, has a 6 feet (1.8 m) diameter at its base and 9 feet (2.7 m) at its top.[1]

History[edit]

The bucket was built in 1887 by the Tennessee Red Cedar Woodenworks Company from Murfreesboro, Tennessee.[1] It was originally displayed in Murfreesboro, until it was displayed at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and the 1904 Saint Louis World's Fair.[1] The cedar bucket factory burned in 1952, and local grocer Crigger’s Market bought the item to display it.[2] It was auctioned off approximately in 1965 and it was purchased by a Rossville, Georgia amusement park.[1] It was brought back to Murfreesboro in 1976 to be displayed at Cannonsburgh Village.[1]

Arson[edit]

On June 19, 2005, the bucket was burned by arsonists.[3] The fire was put out before any adjacent buildings were burned down.[3] Roadside America describes the condition of the bucket as "Severely damaged, the bucket is now blackened and splintered charcoal shards held together by metal bands."[3] As of 2007, the bucket has not been restored.[2] Members of the Rutherford County Blacksmiths’ Association pledged in 2005 to restore the bucket, but they have been unable to locate high quality red cedar.[2]

The arson of the bucket led to the final question in the 2009 Great Midwest Trivia Contest. The question was "Who was going to be married next to what was the 'world's largest cedar bucket' in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in June, 2005, before it mysteriously burned down the week before the wedding date?" The answer was James Walters and Jaki Neubauer.[4]

Rebuilding[edit]

On October 22nd, 2011, a refurbished bucket was unveiled at the 35th annual Harvest Days Festival in Cannonsburgh Pioneer Village. In a partnership between Roy Haney’s sawmill in Cannon County and the Rutherford County Blacksmiths’ Association, high quality, rare red cedar was collected to restore the bucket to its former glory.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "World's Largest Cedar Bucket". World's Largest Roadside Attractions. 2002. Retrieved 2009-02-06. 
  2. ^ a b c Marchesoni, Lisa (2007). "'OK, what’s happened to rebuilding ‘The Bucket?’". Murfreesboro Post. Retrieved 2009-02-06. 
  3. ^ a b c Campbell, Regan (November 3, 2005). "World's largest cedar bucket now in Oxford's backyard". Daily Mississippian. Retrieved 2009-02-06. [dead link]
  4. ^ Peterson, Rick (January 26, 2009). "The Bank, Bucky's Defend Trivia Titles in Lawrence University's 44th Annual Contest". Lawrence University. Retrieved 2009-02-18. 
  5. ^ Willard, Michelle (October 23, 2011). "The Bucket is Back". Murfreesboro Post.