World Affairs Seminar

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The purpose of the World Affairs Seminar is to provide a forum for the world's future leaders to some of the most complex problems. It also provides an environment for students all around the globe to learn and discuss these problems. Furthermore, students get the great opportunity of meeting and sharing different customs from many different countries. In its 30th year (2006), there were students coming over from 32 different countries ranging from Canada to Nigeria. Every year, there are different central themes. The schedule of a regular day in the program includes: lectures, films, small group discussions and the chance to engage social and recreational activities in the campus.

History[edit]

The World Affairs Seminar (WAS) was founded in 1977 by Professors Dr. Gaylon Greenhill and Dr. Dale Brock. Dr. Brock became the first WAS General Manager. Dr. Brock died September 2, 2008.

A scholarship fund in his memory has been created.

Throughout the last 32 years, the World Affairs Seminar has covered timely and significant topics, including human rights, nuclear arms control and disarmament, economics, environmental issues, global health, globalization, security, and global leadership, all with an emphasis on ways that students can make a difference in their communities and beyond.

The World Affairs Seminar has also offered students the chance to interact with people who have worked in government, international organizations, the media, and business. Some past keynote speakers include Dith Pran, New York Times photojournalist; Dr. Oscar Arias, former president of Costa Rica and Nobel Prize winner; Giandomenico Picco, former Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations; Dr. Heinz-Gerhard Justenhoven, director of the Institute for Theology and Peace in Germany; and Ed Cardoza, who works for Partners in Health in Boston, MA.

Themes[edit]

  • World Affairs Seminar 2002 (26th) - "Is Peace Possible in an Age of Global Terror?"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2003 (27th) - "Making Peace: Managing Conflict"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2004 (28th) - "Making Peace by Understanding Conflict"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2005 (29th) - "Globalisation and Tradition: Two Roads Diverge?"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2006 (30th) - "Global Leadership Rising Powers: Who Counts?"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2007 (31st) - "Global Health: Bridging the Divides"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2009 (32nd) - "World Hunger: Ethical Dilemma of Our Time"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2010 (33rd) - "The Global Fresh Water Challenge"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2011 (34th) - "Sustainable Development"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2012 (35th) - "Global Communication 2.0: Technology's Impact on International Understanding"
  • World Affairs Seminar 2013 (36th) - "Gender Equity/Social Justice: Moral Imperative of our time"

References[edit]