World Chocolate Wonderland

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World Chocolate Wonderland (simplified Chinese: 世界巧克力梦公园; traditional Chinese: 世界巧克力夢公園; pinyin: Shìjiè Qiǎokèlì Mènggōngyuán, literally, "World Chocolate Dream Park") is the first chocolate theme park in China.[1] Located in Beijing to the north of the Bird's Nest, its grand opening was on January 29, 2010.[1] It houses the world's biggest chocolate model of the Great Wall of China.[1]

On January 29, 2010, the World Chocolate Wonderland opened to the general public with a fashion show. Models adorned with wigs and dresses made of chocolate strode down the runway. One model wore a dragon costume composed of chocolate gold coins.[2]

The theme park's purpose is to "bring a little sweetness" to the Chinese people during the recession.[3] Furthermore, it was designed to allow visitors to learn about chocolate's history and its impact on other cultures.[4] Because of the impending warm weather that would melt the chocolate, World Chocolate Wonderland closes in April of each year and reopens in January of the next year.[5]

Attractions[edit]

The theme park is 215,000 square feet (20,000 m2) long and contains exhibitions that are fabricated from 176,000 pounds of chocolate.[3] There are three exhibition halls which are temperature-controlled so that the chocolate exhibits, which are enclosed by large glass panes, will not melt.[5]

The park showcases the world's biggest chocolate model of the Great Wall of China.[6] The Great Wall replication is 12 metres (39 ft) long.[4] The admission fee is 80 yuan (12 dollars) per ticket.

World Chocolate Wonderland contains a replica of the famous Terracotta Army. The exhibit comprises 500 life-size figures made from chocolate. It exhibits chocolate shoes and clothes, as well as a BMW car that is made from 2 tons of chocolate.[4] The car required ten craftsmen and six months to build.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "World Chocolate Wonderland to Open in Beijing Friday". Xinhua News Agency. 2010-01-25. Archived from the original on 2010-01-29. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  2. ^ Shapiro, Ari (2010-01-29). "Chocolate Wonderland Opens In Beijing". National Public Radio. Archived from the original on 2010-01-29. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  3. ^ a b "Chocolate Wonderland Opens in China". Christian Broadcasting Network. 2010-01-29. Archived from the original on 2010-01-29. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  4. ^ a b c "Chocolate wonderland opens in China". RIA Novosti. 2010-01-29. Archived from the original on 2010-01-29. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  5. ^ a b c Barriaux, Marianne (2010-01-29). "Chocoholics flock to Beijing's Willy Wonka-style park". Agence France-Presse. Archived from the original on 2010-01-29. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  6. ^ "A look around China's new chocolate wonderland". BBC. 2010-01-29. Archived from the original on 2010-01-29. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 

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