World Curling Championships

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World Curling Championships
Worldwomenschampionshiptrophy.JPG
World Women's Curling Championship trophy
Sport Curling
Founded 1959 (men)
1979 (women)
No. of teams 12
Most recent champion(s)  Norway (men)
  Switzerland (women)
Most titles  Canada (men; 34 titles)
 Canada (women; 15 titles)

The World Curling Championships are the annual world championships for curling, organized by the World Curling Federation and contested by national championship teams. There are men's, women's and mixed doubles championships, as well as junior and senior championships for each gender. There is also a world championship for wheelchair curling. The men's championship started in 1959, while the women's started in 1979. The mixed doubles championship was started in 2008. Since 2005, the men's and women's championships have been held in different venues, with Canada hosting one of the two championships every year: the men's championship in odd years, and the women's championship in even years. Canada has dominated both the men's and women's championships since their inception, although Switzerland, Sweden, Denmark, Germany (West Germany), Scotland, the United States and Norway have all won at least one championship.

History[edit]

The World Curling Championships began in 1959 as the Scotch Cup. The first three Cups were contested between men's teams from Scotland and Canada. The United States joined the Scotch Cup in 1961, and Sweden also joined the next year. Canada won the first six world titles, of which the legendary rink skipped by Ernie Richardson earned four. The United States was the first country to break Canada's streak, winning their first world title in 1965. By 1967, Norway, Switzerland, France, and Germany were added to the Scotch Cup, and Scotland won their first title, while Canada finished without a medal for the first time. The tournament was renamed the Air Canada Silver Broom the year after that, and Canada strung together five consecutive world titles starting in that year.

In 1973, the competing field was expanded to ten teams, and Italy and Denmark were introduced to the world stage. Sweden, Switzerland, and Norway won their first titles in the following years, and Canada continued to win medals of all colours. In 1979, the first edition of the women's World Curling Championships was held. The championships were held separately from the men's championships for the first ten years. During this time, Switzerland, Canada, Sweden, Denmark, and Germany won world titles.

Beginning in 1989, the men's and women's championships were held together. Norway won their first world women's title. In 1995, Ford Canada and the World Curling Federation reached an agreement to make Ford the sponsor of the World Curling Championships.[1] Japan, the first nation from Asia to compete in the worlds, made their debut in 1990 at the women's championship, and later in 2000 at the men's championship. South Korea and China followed suit in the 2000s. Scotland won their first women's title in 2002, and the United States won their first women's title the next year.

In 2005, the men's and women's championships were separated, and an agreement was made between the World Curling Federation and the Canadian Curling Association that one of the two world championships would be sponsored by Ford Canada and would be held in Canada each year. Canada began a streak of top two finishes in the men's tournament, and China won their first world title in the women's tournament in 2009.

In 2008, a world championship for mixed doubles curling was created. Switzerland won the first world mixed doubles title, and proceeded to win four of the first five titles. Russia and Hungary won their first world curling titles in the mixed doubles championship, and New Zealand, France, Austria, and the Czech Republic won their first world curling medals.

Bronze medals were not awarded until 1985 for the women's tournament and 1986 for the men's tournament. Between 1989 and 1994, the bronze medal was shared by the semifinals losers.

Tournament names[edit]

The World Curling Championships have been known by a number of different names over the years.

Men

  • 1959–1967: Scotch Cup
  • 1968–1985: Air Canada Silver Broom
  • 1986–1988: IOC President's Cup (Hexagon)
  • 1989–1990: WCF Championships
  • 1991–1992: Safeway World Curling Championship
  • 1993–1994: WCF Championships
  • 1995–2004: Ford World Curling Championship
  • 2005–present: Ford World Men's Curling Championship (odd years)
  • 2006–present: World Men's Curling Championship (even years)

Women

  • 1979–1981: Royal Bank of Scotland World Curling Championships
  • 1982: World Curling Championships
  • 1983: Pioneer Life World Curling Championships
  • 1984: World Curling Championships
  • 1985: H&M World Curling Championships
  • 1986–1990: World Curling Championships
  • 1991–1992: Safeway World Curling Championships
  • 1993–1994: World Curling Championships
  • 1995–2004: Ford World Curling Championships
  • 2005–present: World Women's Curling Championship (odd years)
  • 2006–present: Ford World Women's Curling Championship (even years)

Competition format[edit]

The first two world championships, held as competitions between Scotland and Canada, were held as five-game series between the two nations. Upon the addition of the United States in 1961, the format was changed to a double round robin preliminary round with a three-team knockout round at the conclusion of the round robin. The knockout round was removed for the next two championships. With the addition of more teams, a single round robin preliminary round with a four-team knockout round was implemented in 1971. The championships occurring from 1968 to 1970 included three-team knockout rounds instead of four-team knockout rounds. The knockout round format was adjusted from single-elimination to the Page playoff system in 2005.

In the championships held from 1971 to 1985, third place was awarded to either the team that lost in the semifinal of a three-team knockout round or the higher-seeded team among the losing teams of a four-team knockout round. A bronze medal game was added to the knockout round in 1986, but bronze medal games were not held from 1989 to 1994, during which bronze medals were awarded to the teams that lost in the semifinals.

The current format of the world championships uses a twelve team round-robin preliminary round, after which the top four teams advance to a knockout round held using the Page playoff system.

Championships[edit]

Men[edit]

Scotsman David Murdoch is a two-time world champion.
Year Host Champion Finalist
1959 Scotland Falkirk, Perth, and Edinburgh, Scotland  Canada  Scotland
1960 Scotland Ayr, Edinburgh, and Glasgow, Scotland  Canada (2)  Scotland
1961 Scotland Ayr, Kirkcaldy, Perth, and Edinburgh, Scotland  Canada (3)  Scotland
1962 Scotland Falkirk and Edinburgh, Scotland  Canada (4)  United States
1963 Scotland Perth, Scotland  Canada (5)  Scotland
1964 Canada Calgary, Canada  Canada (6)  Scotland
1965 Scotland Perth, Scotland  United States  Canada
1966 Canada Vancouver, Canada  Canada (7)  Scotland
1967 Scotland Perth, Scotland  Scotland  Sweden
1968 Canada Pointe-Claire, Canada  Canada (8)  Scotland
1969 Scotland Perth, Scotland  Canada (9)  United States
1970 United States Utica, United States  Canada (10)  Scotland
1971 France Megève, France  Canada (11)  Scotland
1972 Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany  Canada (12)  United States
1973 Canada Regina, Canada  Sweden  Canada
1974 Switzerland Berne, Switzerland  United States (2)  Sweden
1975 Scotland Perth, Scotland   Switzerland  United States
1976 United States Duluth, United States  United States (3)  Scotland
1977 Sweden Karlstad, Sweden  Sweden (2)  Canada
1978 Canada Winnipeg, Canada  United States (4)  Norway
1979 Switzerland Berne, Switzerland  Norway   Switzerland
1980 Canada Moncton, Canada  Canada (13)  Norway
1981 Canada London, Canada   Switzerland (2)  United States
1982 Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany  Canada (14)   Switzerland
1983 Canada Regina, Canada  Canada (15)  Germany
1984 United States Duluth, United States  Norway (2)   Switzerland
1985 Scotland Glasgow, Scotland  Canada (16)  Sweden
1986 Canada Toronto, Canada  Canada (17)  Scotland
1987 Canada Vancouver, Canada  Canada (18)  Germany
1988 Switzerland Lausanne, Switzerland  Norway (3)  Canada
1989 United States Milwaukee, United States  Canada (19)   Switzerland
1990 Sweden Västerås, Sweden  Canada (20)  Scotland
1991 Canada Winnipeg, Canada  Scotland (2)  Canada
1992 Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany   Switzerland (3)  Scotland
1993 Switzerland Geneva, Switzerland  Canada (21)  Scotland
1994 Germany Oberstdorf, Germany  Canada (22)  Sweden
1995 Canada Brandon, Canada  Canada (23)  Scotland
1996 Canada Hamilton, Canada  Canada (24)  Scotland
1997 Switzerland Berne, Switzerland  Sweden (3)  Germany
1998 Canada Kamloops, Canada  Canada (25)  Sweden
1999 Canada Saint John, Canada  Scotland (3)  Canada
2000 Scotland Glasgow, Scotland  Canada (26)  Sweden
2001 Switzerland Lausanne, Switzerland  Sweden (4)   Switzerland
2002 United States Bismarck, United States  Canada (27)  Norway
2003 Canada Winnipeg, Canada  Canada (28)   Switzerland
2004 Sweden Gävle, Sweden  Sweden (5)  Germany
2005 Canada Victoria, Canada  Canada (29)  Scotland
2006 United States Lowell, United States  Scotland (4)  Canada
2007 Canada Edmonton, Canada  Canada (30)  Germany
2008 United States Grand Forks, United States  Canada (31)  Scotland
2009 Canada Moncton, Canada  Scotland (5)  Canada
2010 Italy Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy  Canada (32)  Norway
2011 Canada Regina, Canada  Canada (33)  Scotland
2012 Switzerland Basel, Switzerland  Canada (34)  Scotland
2013 Canada Victoria, Canada[2][3]  Sweden (6)  Canada
2014 China Beijing, China  Norway (4)  Sweden
2015 Canada Halifax, Canada
2016 Switzerland Basel, Switzerland

Women[edit]

Year Host Champion Finalist
1979 Scotland Perth, Scotland   Switzerland  Sweden
1980 Scotland Perth, Scotland  Canada  Sweden
1981 Scotland Perth, Scotland  Sweden  Canada
1982 Switzerland Geneva, Switzerland  Denmark  Sweden
1983 Canada Moose Jaw, Canada   Switzerland (2)  Norway
1984 Scotland Perth, Scotland  Canada (2)   Switzerland
1985 Sweden Jönköping, Sweden  Canada (3)  Scotland
1986 Canada Kelowna, Canada  Canada (4)  Germany
1987 United States Chicago, United States  Canada (5)  Germany
1988 Scotland Glasgow, Scotland  Germany  Canada
1989 United States Milwaukee, United States  Canada (6)  Norway
1990 Sweden Västerås, Sweden  Norway  Scotland
1991 Canada Winnipeg, Canada  Norway (2)  Canada
1992 Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany  Sweden (2)  United States
1993 Switzerland Geneva, Switzerland  Canada (7)  Germany
1994 Germany Oberstdorf, Germany  Canada (8)  Scotland
1995 Canada Brandon, Canada  Sweden (3)  Canada
1996 Canada Hamilton, Canada  Canada (9)  United States
1997 Switzerland Berne, Switzerland  Canada (10)  Norway
1998 Canada Kamloops, Canada  Sweden (4)  Denmark
1999 Canada Saint John, Canada  Sweden (5)  United States
2000 Scotland Glasgow, Scotland  Canada (11)   Switzerland
2001 Switzerland Lausanne, Switzerland  Canada (12)  Sweden
2002 United States Bismarck, United States  Scotland  Sweden
2003 Canada Winnipeg, Canada  United States  Canada
2004 Sweden Gävle, Sweden  Canada (13)  Norway
2005 Scotland Paisley, Scotland  Sweden (6)  United States
2006 Canada Grande Prairie, Canada  Sweden (7)  United States
2007 Japan Aomori, Japan  Canada (14)  Denmark
2008 Canada Vernon, Canada  Canada (15)  China
2009 South Korea Gangneung, South Korea  China  Sweden
2010 Canada Swift Current, Canada  Germany (2)  Scotland
2011 Denmark Esbjerg, Denmark  Sweden (8)  Canada
2012 Canada Lethbridge, Canada[4]   Switzerland (3)  Sweden
2013 Latvia Riga, Latvia[5]  Scotland (2)  Sweden
2014 Canada Saint John, Canada   Switzerland (4)  Canada
2015 Japan Sapporo, Japan[6]
2016 Canada Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada[7]

Mixed Doubles[edit]

Year Host Champion Finalist
2008 Finland Vierumäki, Finland   Switzerland  Finland
2009 Italy Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy   Switzerland (2)  Hungary
2010 Russia Chelyabinsk, Russia  Russia  New Zealand
2011 United States St. Paul, United States   Switzerland (3)  Russia
2012 Turkey Erzurum, Turkey[8]   Switzerland (4)  Sweden
2013 Canada Fredericton, Canada[9]  Hungary  Sweden
2014 Scotland Dumfries, Scotland   Switzerland (5)  Sweden
2015 Russia Sochi, Russia[10]

Wheelchair[edit]

Year Host Champion Finalist
2002 Switzerland Sursee, Switzerland   Switzerland  Canada
2004 Switzerland Sursee, Switzerland  Scotland   Switzerland
2005 Scotland Braehead, Scotland  Scotland (2)  Denmark
2007 Sweden Sollefteå, Sweden  Norway   Switzerland
2008 Switzerland Sursee, Switzerland  Norway (2)  South Korea
2009 Canada Vancouver, Canada  Canada  Sweden
2011 Czech Republic Prague, Czech Republic  Canada (2)  Scotland
2012 South Korea Chuncheon City, South Korea  Russia  South Korea
2013 Russia Sochi, Russia  Canada (3)  Sweden
2015 Finland Lohja, Finland

National championships[edit]

Men[edit]

Women[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]