World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

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The World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims takes place on the third Sunday in November every year as the appropriate acknowledgment of victims of road traffic crashes and their families. It was started by the British road crash victim charity, RoadPeace, in 1993 and was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2005.

History[edit]

In 1993, the first day of remembrance which was organised by Brigitte Chaudhry, Founder of RoadPeace. In 1995 the General Assembly of European Federation of Road Traffic Victims added its support and by 1998 the event was being held in a number of countries including Argentina, Australia, Israel, South Africa, and Trinidad[1] in addition to the United Kingdom. The World Health Organisation added its support in 2003 and in 2005 the United Nations General Assembly invited all nations to observe the day 'as the appropriate acknowledgment of victims of road traffic crashes and their families'.[2][3]

In 2007 events were held in 18 countries;[4] it was marked by candlelight parades in Israel, a multi-faith gathering in Australia, theatre performances in Mexico, and a seminar in Japan.[5]

In 2008 events were held 28 countries including Belgium, Croatia, France, Greece, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Mexico, The Netherlands, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Uganda, UK and USA.[6]

In 2009 events were held in 30 countries.[7] Canada's Transport Minister John Baird offered condolences to those affected by the estimated 3,000 fatalities and 200,000 injuries from road crashes that occur every year in Canada.[8] In England a service was held in Canterbury Cathedral[9] and in Ripon Cathedral[10] Some 1,000 people attended a service in Knock Shrine in Ireland[11] Pope Benedict XVI prayed for "all who have been killed or injured in road accidents".[12] Services were also held in Barbados[13] India,[14] Namibia[15] and many other places.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Promoting National Awareness of Road Safety". Transport Canada. Retrieved 2010-02-27. 
  2. ^ "about". World Day of Remembrance. Retrieved 2010-02-26. 
  3. ^ United Nations General Assembly Session 60 Resolution 5. Improving global road safety A/RES/60/5 page 3. 26 October 2005. Retrieved 2008-07-09.
  4. ^ "archive". World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  5. ^ "Ceremonies held worldwide to mark UN day remembering road traffic victims" (Press release). United Nations. 18 November 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-09. 
  6. ^ "World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims". itnews. Retrieved 2010-02-27. 
  7. ^ "Events and actions". World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. Retrieved 2010-02-27. 
  8. ^ "Baird Recognizes National Day of Remembrance for Road Crash Victims". Retrieved 2010-02-27. 
  9. ^ "Service remembers crash victims". BBC News. 2009-11-15. Retrieved 2010-02-27. 
  10. ^ "Cathedral service remembers victims of road accidents". Yorkshire Post. 
  11. ^ "Services remember road traffic victims". Totally Catholic. Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  12. ^ "The world is finite and will someday end, but the Word of God is eternal and will never die". Retrieved 2010-02-28. 
  13. ^ "Make roads safer!". Barbados Advocate. Retrieved 2010-02-27. 
  14. ^ "Concern over rise in number of road accidents". The Hindu. Retrieved 2010-02-27. 
  15. ^ "Accidents victims remembered". Namibia conomist. 

See also[edit]

www.worlddayofremembrance.org www.fevr.org www.roadpeace.org Road safety