World of Children Awards

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World of Children® Award is a global recognition and funding program for people specifically and exclusively serving the needs of children. Sometimes referred to as the "Nobel Prize for Child Advocacy,"[1] the San Francisco Bay Area based nonprofit was founded in 1996 and is led by Co-Founder's Harry Leibowitz and his wife, Kay Isaacson-Leibowitz.[2] World of Children Award recognizes changemakers nominated for the Health, Humanitarian and Youth Awards and provides cash grants to support development of their programs serving children.

Awards process[edit]

Nominations[edit]

Individuals from all over the world may be nominated for a World of Children Health, Humanitarian or Youth Award. Nominations are entered online through the World of Children Award website. For 16 years and counting, World of Children Award has received over 2000 Nominations from more than 80 countries. With the announcement of the 2013 Honorees, World of Children Award reached an exciting milestone: 100 Honorees,[3] or Award Winners, have now been honored overseeing work in 50 countries. Nominations for World of Children Award open each year in January and close for review in May.[2]

Humanitarian Award[edit]

The Humanitarian Award recognizes an individual who has made a significant contribution to children in the areas of social services, education or humanitarian services. The Nominee must have created or managed a sustainable program which has significantly contributed to children's opportunities to be safe, to learn and to grow. They must do this work over and above their normal employment, or work for little or no pay. The Nominee must have been doing this for a minimum of 10 years. They must have an existing non-profit organization in good standing, which can receive grant funds if awarded.[4]

Health Award[edit]

The Health Award recognizes an individual who has made a significant contribution to children in the fields of health, medicine or the sciences. The Nominee must have created or managed a sustainable program which has significantly contributed to the improved health of children. They must do this work over and above their normal employment, or work for little or no pay. They must have been doing this for a minimum of 10 years and must have an existing non-profit organization in good standing, which can receive grant funds if awarded.[4]

Youth Award[edit]

The Youth Award recognizes youth that are making extraordinary contributions to the lives of other children. The Nominee must be under the age of 21 and must have been engaged in this work for a minimum of three years.[4]

Selection process[edit]

To ensure credibility of the child advocates that are honored, World of Children Award uses a multi-tiered, independent vetting process. After the Nominations deadline has closed each year, the World of Children does an internal review of all Nominations submitted to be sure they meet eligibility requirements. The nominations are passed through a series of independent review teams all following a set of standardized scoring criteria to determine category finalists. A formal international investigative agency then conducts an independent audit of each final applicant, visiting each program site and examining the organization serving children.[5]

In the final selection stage, the World of Children Board of Governors reviews the independent audit reports, and votes to approve the final slate of Honorees. Each year, the Board of Governors then determines the final annual grant allocations to be shared with the children’s programs led by each Honoree. The World of Children notifies the Finalists of their Award status before the annual World of Children Award Events are held in New York City in November.[5]

Awards ceremony[edit]

The World of Children Award ceremony is held in New York City and is attended by press, ambassadors and dignitaries. The events are usually held in early November.[6]

Celebrity ambassador[edit]

In January, 2010, American actress, Stephanie March joined World of Children Award as the organization’s Celebrity Ambassador. March is still actively involved in the organization.[7] From 2000-2010, American boxer and three-time World Heavyweight Champion, Muhammad Ali served as the Honorary Chair for World of Children Award.

Give Up Your Birthday Campaign[edit]

World of Children Award launched a Give Up Your Birthday campaign in 2012,[8] an effort to raise funds for the Awards program and the work that it supports through individual birthday donations. The campaign centered on a website where individuals can create a Birthday Page and ask friends and family to make a donation to the World of Children Award in their name in lieu of gifts. Celebrity Ambassador, Stephanie March, announced that she would be Giving Up Her Birthday in 2010.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Op-Ed Columnist - Talia for President - Editorial - NYTimes.com
  2. ^ a b "Founders". Worldofchildren.org. 2009-11-05. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  3. ^ http://www.worldofchildren.org/theaward/2013-world-of-children-award-honorees/
  4. ^ a b c "World of Children". Blacktiemagazine.com. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  5. ^ a b "Selection Process". Worldofchildren.org. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  6. ^ "Annual Timeline". Worldofchildren.org. 2012-04-01. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  7. ^ "Celebrity Ambassador". Worldofchildren.org. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  8. ^ "Give Up Your Birthday Website". Giveupyourbirthday.com. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  9. ^ "Stephanie March: Giving Up My Birthday for World of Children". Huffingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 

External links[edit]