Men's hammer throw world record progression

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The following table shows progression of the world record in the men's hammer throw, as recognised by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).[1] The first world record in the event was recognised by the IAAF in 1913.[2] As of June 21, 2009, 45 world records have been ratified by the IAAF in the event.[2]

World record progression[edit]

Distance Athlete Nationality Venue Date
57.77 m Pat Ryan  United States New York City, USA August 17, 1913
59.00 m Erwin Blask  Germany Stockholm, Sweden August 27, 1938
59.02 m Imre Nemeth  Hungary Tata, Hungary July 14, 1948
59.57 m Imre Nemeth  Hungary Katowice, Poland September 4, 1949
59.88 m Imre Nemeth  Hungary Budapest, Hungary May 19, 1950
60.34 m József Csermák  Hungary Helsinki, Finland July 24, 1952
61.25 m Sverre Strandli  Norway Oslo, Norway September 14, 1952
62.36 m Sverre Strandli  Norway Oslo, Norway September 5, 1953
63.34 m Mikhail Krivonosov  Soviet Union Berne, Switzerland August 29, 1954
64.05 m Stanislav Nenashev  Soviet Union Baku, Soviet Union December 12, 1954
64.33 m Mikhail Krivonosov  Soviet Union Warsaw, Poland August 4, 1955
64.52 m Mikhail Krivonosov  Soviet Union Belgrade, SFR Yugoslavia September 19, 1955
65.85 m Mikhail Krivonosov  Soviet Union Nalchik, Soviet Union April 25, 1956
66.38 m Mikhail Krivonosov  Soviet Union Minsk, Soviet Union July 8, 1956
67.32 m Mikhail Krivonosov  Soviet Union Tashkent, Soviet Union October 22, 1956
68.54 m Hal Connolly  United States Los Angeles, USA November 2, 1956
68.68 m Hal Connolly  United States Bakersfield, USA June 20, 1958
70.33 m Hal Connolly  United States Walnut, USA August 12, 1960
70.67 m Hal Connolly  United States Palo Alto, USA July 21, 1962
71.06 m Hal Connolly  United States Ceres, USA May 29, 1965
71.26 m Hal Connolly  United States Walnut, USA June 20, 1965
73.74 m Gyula Zsivotzky  Hungary Debrecen, Hungary September 4, 1965
73.76 m Gyula Zsivotzky  Hungary Budapest, Hungary September 14, 1968
74.52 m Romuald Klim  Soviet Union Budapest, Hungary June 15, 1969
74.68 m Anatoliy Bondarchuk  Soviet Union Piraeus, Greece September 20, 1969
75.48 m Anatoliy Bondarchuk  Soviet Union Rovno, Soviet Union October 12, 1969
76.40 m Walter Schmidt  West Germany Lahr, West Germany September 4, 1971
76.60 m Reinhard Theimer  East Germany Erfurt, East Germany July 4, 1974
76.66 m Aleksei Spiridonov  Soviet Union Munich, West Germany September 11, 1974
76.70 m Karl-Hans Riehm  West Germany Rehlingen, Germany May 19, 1975
77.76 m Karl-Hans Riehm  West Germany Rehlingen, West Germany May 19, 1975
78.50 m Karl-Hans Riehm  West Germany Rehlingen, West Germany May 19, 1975
79.30 m Walter Schmidt  West Germany Frankfurt, West Germany August 14, 1975
80.14 m Boris Zaichuk  Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union July 9, 1978
80.32 m Karl-Hans Riehm  West Germany Heidenheim, West Germany August 6, 1978
80.38 m Yuriy Sedykh  Soviet Union Leselidse, Soviet Union May 16, 1980
80.46 m Jüri Tamm  Soviet Union Leselidse, Soviet Union May 16, 1980
80.64 m Yuriy Sedykh  Soviet Union Leselidse, Soviet Union May 16, 1980
81.66 m Sergey Litvinov  Soviet Union Sochi, Soviet Union May 24, 1980
81.80 m Yuriy Sedykh  Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union July 31, 1980
83.98 m Sergey Litvinov  Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union June 4, 1982
84.14 m Sergey Litvinov  Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union June 21, 1983
86.34 m Yuriy Sedykh  Soviet Union Cork, Ireland July 3, 1984
86.66 m Yuriy Sedykh  Soviet Union Tallinn, Soviet Union June 22, 1986
86.74 m Yuriy Sedykh  Soviet Union Stuttgart, West Germany August 30, 1986

Notes[edit]

Many sources do not give the date of Theimer's world record. It occurred in the qualifying round of the East German Championships at Erfurt (not Leipzig), which ran from the July 3–6, 1974. His record came with his very first throw, his series being (76.60m 73.62m 73.28m) which was on day two of the championships, July 4, 1974. Next day, in the championship itself, he threw 73.62m (241 ft. 6") for first place.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Athletix
  2. ^ a b "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009." (pdf). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 558–9. Archived from the original on November 23, 2012. Retrieved August 5, 2009. 
  3. ^ Athletics Weekly, (AW28.31.16)