Wrecking yard

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Old cars rusting away
A breaker's yard in the UK, showing cars stacked on metal frames to make it easier to find and remove usable parts.
Crushed cars stored at a scrapyard

A wrecking yard (Australian, New Zealand, and Canadian English), scrapyard (British English) or junkyard (American English) is the location of a business in dismantling where wrecked or decommissioned vehicles are brought, their usable parts are sold for use in operating vehicles, while the unusable metal parts, known as scrap metal parts, are sold to metal-recycling companies. Other terms include wreck yard, wrecker's yard, salvage yard, breakers yard, dismantler and scrapheap. In the United Kingdom, car salvage yards are known as car breakers, while motorcycle salvage yards are known as bike breakers.

Types of wreck yards[edit]

The most common type of wreck yards are automobile wreck yards, but junkyards for motorcycles, bicycles, small airplanes and boats exist too.

Scrapyard[edit]

A scrapyard is a recycling center that buys and sells scrap metal. Scrapyards are effectively a scrap metal brokerage.[1] Scrap yards typically buy any base metal; for example, iron, steel, stainless steel, brass, copper, aluminum, zinc, nickel, and lead would all be found at a modern-day scrapyard. Scrapyards will often buy electronics, appliances, and metal vehicles. Scrapyards will sell their accumulations of metals either to refineries or larger scrap brokers. Metal theft is committed so thieves can sell stolen copper or other stolen valuable metals to scrapyards.[2]

Operation[edit]

Many salvage yards operate on a local level—when an automobile is severely damaged, has malfunctioned beyond repair, or not worth the repair, the owner may sell it to a junkyard; in some cases—as when the car has become disabled in a place where derelict cars are not allowed to be left—the car owner will pay the wrecker to haul the car away. Salvage yards also buy most of the wrecked, derelict and abandoned vehicles that are sold at auction from police impound storage lots, and often buy vehicles from insurance tow yards as well. The salvage yard will usually tow the vehicle from the location of its purchase to the yard, but occasionally vehicles are driven in. At the salvage yard the automobiles are typically arranged in rows, often stacked on top of one another. Some yards keep inventories in their offices, as to the usable parts in each car, as well as the car's location in the yard. Many yards have computerized inventory systems.

In recent years it is becoming increasingly common to use satellite part finder services to contact multiple salvage yards from a single source. In the 20th century these were call centres that charged a premium rate for calls and compiled a facsimile that was sent to various salvage yards so they could respond directly if the part was in stock. Many of these are now Web-based with requests for parts being e-mailed instantly.

A "you pull it" scrapyard in the US
Loading a barge in New York

Often parts for which there is high demand are removed from cars and brought to the salvage yard's warehouse. Then a customer who asks for a specific part can get it immediately, without having to wait for the salvage yard employees to remove that part. Some salvage yards expect customers to remove the part themselves (known as "self-service yards", or allow this at a substantially reduced price compared to having the junkyard's staff remove it. This style of yard is often referred to as a "You Pull It" yard. As of 2013 many North American self-service yards are listed on ROW52.com along with their vehicle inventory; enabling customers from outside the immediate vicinity of the self-service junkyard to view vehicles on the lot and use the ROW52 Parts Puller social-commerce program to obtain the parts they need. [3]

However, it is more common for a customer to call in and inquire whether the specific item he/she needs is available. If the yard has the requested item, the customer is usually asked to leave a deposit and to come to pick up the part at a later time. The part is typically installed by the customer or agent ("the customer's mechanic"); however, some salvage yards also provide installation services.

The parts typically dismantled from automobiles are generally any that can be re-sold such as the light assemblies (commonly known as just "lights", e.g. headlights, blinkers, taillights), seats, parts of the exhaust system, mirrors, hubcaps etc. Late model vehicles will often have entire halves or sections of the body removed and stored on shelves as inventory. Other major parts such as the engine and transmission are often removed and sold, usually to auto-parts companies that will rebuild the part and resell it with a warranty, or will sell the components as-is in used condition, either with or without warranty. Other, usually very large, junkyards will rebuild and sell such parts themselves. Unbroken windshields and windows may also be removed intact and resold to car-owners needing replacements. Some salvage yards will sell damaged or wrecked but repairable vehicles to amateur car builders, or older vehicles to collectors, who will restore ("rebuild") the car for their own use or entertainment, or sometimes for re-sale. These cars are known as "rebuilders".

Once vehicles in a wrecking yard have no more usable parts, the hulks are usually sold to a scrap-metal processor, who will usually crush the bodies on-site at the yard's premises using a mobile baling press, Shredder, or flattener, with final disposal occurring within a hammer mill which literally smashes the vehicle remains into fist sized chunks. These chunks are then sold by multiple tons for further processing and recycling.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1][dead link]
  2. ^ "FBI: Copper thieves jeopardize US infrastructure". Networkworld.com. Retrieved 2013-02-19. 
  3. ^ "Search for vehicles at self-service auto recycling yards!". Row52. Retrieved 2013-02-19.