Wright Model R

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Wright Model R
Wright Model R at Belmont Park, 1910.png
The "Baby Grand" at Belmont Park.
Role Racing aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Wright Company
First flight 1910
Developed from Wright Model B

The Wright Model R was a single-seat biplane built by the Wright Company in Dayton, Ohio, in 1910. Also known as the Roadster or the Baby Wright, it was designed for speed and altitude competitions.

Design[edit]

The Wright Model R was derived from the Wright Model B, and was a two-bay biplane with rear-mounted twin rudders mounted in front of a single elevator and carried on wire-braced wood booms behind the wing and was powered by a 30 hp (22 kW) Wright four-cylinder inline water-cooled engine driving a pair of pusher propellers via chains.[1]

Operational history[edit]

The "Baby Grand" at Simms Station, Ohio.

Two examples were flown at the International Aviation Tournament at Belmont Park in November 1910, one being a standard model flown by Alec Ogilvie and the other being a special competition model known as the Baby Grand, which had a 60 hp (45 kW) V-8 engine and a reduced wingspan of 21 ft 5 in (6.53 m). Orville Wright succeeded in flying the Baby Grand at a speed of nearly 70 mph (110 km/h). Both aircraft were entered for the second Gordon Bennett Trophy competiotion which was held at the meeting, but the Baby Grand, flown by Walter Brookins, suffered an engine failure during a trial flight on the race day and crashed heavily. Ogililvie's aircraft also had engine problems, having to make a stop of nearly an hour to make repairs, but was nevertheless placed third.[2]

Ogilvie also flew his aircraft in the 1912 Gordon Bennet competition, re-engined with a 50 hp (37 kW) N.E.C. engine.

Specifications[edit]

Data from "1910 Wright Model R". Retrieved 20 May 2012. 

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 27 ft (8.2 m)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
  • Wing area: 185 sq ft (17.2 m2)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wright 4-cylinder water-cooled piston engine, 30 hp (22 kW)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed x2 chain driven pusher, 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m) diameter

Performance

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Munson 1969, p.42
  2. ^ "The American International Meeting"Flight 5 November 1910
Bibliography
  • McFarland, Marvin (ed), The Papers of Wilbur and Orville Wright vol. 2. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1953, p. 1199.
  • Munson, Kenneth, Pioneer Aircraft 1903-1914. London: Blandford, 1969.

External links[edit]