Wugang, Hunan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Wugang
武冈市
County-level city
Wugang is located in Hunan
Wugang
Wugang
Location in Hunan
Coordinates: 26°47′20″N 110°44′06″E / 26.789°N 110.735°E / 26.789; 110.735Coordinates: 26°47′20″N 110°44′06″E / 26.789°N 110.735°E / 26.789; 110.735[1]
Country People's Republic of China
Province Hunan
Prefecture-level city Shaoyang
Time zone China Standard (UTC+8)
Postal code 422400

Wugang (simplified Chinese: 武冈; traditional Chinese: 武岡; pinyin: Wǔgāng) is a county-level city under the administration of Shaoyang, Hunan province, China.

Language[edit]

The Wugang dialect belongs to Xiang Chinese language. The minority languages of Miao people and Yao people are also spoken.

Ethnic groups[edit]

Wugang is mostly populated by Xiang-speaking people which is a branch of Han-Chinese.

There are also Miao minority and Yao minority living in Wugang.[2][3] One branch of the Wugang Yao people is known as "Tang" (擋).[4]

Demographics[edit]

Wugang has a population of approximately 730,000.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Wugang
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 8
(46)
9
(48)
14
(57)
20
(68)
25
(77)
29
(84)
32
(89)
32
(89)
28
(82)
22
(71)
16
(60)
11
(51)
20.5
(68.5)
Average low °C (°F) 2
(35)
3
(37)
7
(44)
13
(55)
17
(62)
21
(69)
23
(73)
22
(71)
19
(66)
14
(57)
9
(48)
3
(37)
12.8
(54.5)
Precipitation mm (inches) 61
(2.4)
76
(3.0)
109
(4.3)
175
(6.9)
216
(8.5)
193
(7.6)
112
(4.4)
137
(5.4)
84
(3.3)
99
(3.9)
81
(3.2)
46
(1.8)
1,392
(54.8)
Source: Weatherbase [5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Google Inc. "Wugang". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://www.google.com/maps/place/Wugang,+Shaoyang,+Hunan/@26.7893194,110.7349743,10z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x36a241ed88cb8d8d:0x88006d0ce3e394f2. Retrieved 2014-07-02.
  2. ^ Original from the University of Michigan Digitized Jul 23, 2011Herold Jacob Wiens (1967). Han Chinese expansion in South China (reprint ed.). Shoe String Press. p. 276. Retrieved March 1, 2012. The Yun-nan districts of Kuang-nan, Ch'iu-pei and Fu-ning also have some Yao who have migrated from Kuang-hsi in the last few decades, but the numbers are small. 20 Ling Shun-sheng mentioned them in 1947 only in Shu-p'u, Chien-yang, Wu-kang, Tao Hsien and Yung-ming.zl 4. 
  3. ^ Herold Jacob Wiens, United States. Office of Naval Research (1952). China's march into the tropics: a discussion of the southward penetration of China's culture, peoples, and political control in relation to the non-Han-Chinese peoples of South China and in the perspective of historical and cultural geography. Defense Technical Information Center. Retrieved March 1, 2012. Ling Shuh-sheng mentions-them at present only in Shu-p'u, Chien-yang, Wu- kang, Tao Hsien and Yung-ming. 1 4. The She (Hsia) of 
  4. ^ Richard David Cushman (1970). Rebel haunts and lotus huts: problems in the ethnohistory of the Yao, Part 1. Cornell. p. 111. Retrieved March 1, 2012. 259 Tang (y) ^ a. Mandarin b. ? c. 59:85:t3a d. Chinese name for Yao subgroup in Wu kang chou, Hunan? Tanh y a. Annamese b. Blue clothes c. 594:264 d. Used by Annamese to refer to the Ch'ing i. Variant of Xanh ye 51 500 Tchang fa (y) a. Mandarin b. 
  5. ^ "Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Wugang, China". Weatherbase. 2011.  Retrieved on November 24, 2011.