XO-3

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This article is about the star. For the computer from the 'One Laptop Per Child' initiative, see OLPC XO-3.
XO-3
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Camelopardalis[1]
Right ascension 04h 21m 52.707s[2]
Declination +57° 49′ 01.87″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) 9.80 ± 0.03[3]
Characteristics
Spectral type F5V[3]
Apparent magnitude (B) 10.25 ± 0.03[3]
Apparent magnitude (V) 9.80 ± 0.03[3]
Apparent magnitude (J) 9.013 ± 0.029[4]
Apparent magnitude (H) 8.845 ± 0.018[4]
Apparent magnitude (K) 8.791 ± 0.019[4]
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: –3.2 ± 0.6[2] mas/yr
Dec.: 3.2 ± 0.7[2] mas/yr
Distance 568 ± 59[5] ly
(174 ± 18[5] pc)
Details
Mass 1.213 ± 0.066[5] M
Radius 1.377 ± 0.083[5] R
Luminosity 2.92+0.59
−0.48
[5] L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.244 ± 0.041[5] cgs
Temperature 6429 ± 100[5] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] –0.177 ± 0.08[5] dex
Age 2.82+0.58
−0.82
[5] Gyr
Other designations
TYC 3727-1064-1, GSC 03727-01064, 2MASS J04215269+5749018[6]

XO-3 is a star in the constellation Camelopardalis. The star has a magnitude of 10 and is not visible to the naked eye but is visible through a small telescope.[3] A search for a binary companion star using adaptive optics at the MMT Observatory was negative.[7]

Planetary system[edit]

In 2007 the gas giant exoplanet XO-3b was discovered by the XO Telescope using the transit method. This object may be classed as brown dwarf because of its high mass.[3]

The XO-3 planetary system[5][8][9]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b 11.79 ± 0.59 MJ 0.0454 ± 0.00082 3.1915289 ± 0.0000032 0.2883 ± 0.0025

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roman, Nancy G. (1987). "Identification of a Constellation From a Position". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 99 (617): 695–699. Bibcode:1987PASP...99..695R. doi:10.1086/132034.  Vizier query form
  2. ^ a b c d Zacharias, N. et al. (2013). "The Fourth US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC4)". The Astronomical Journal 145 (2). 44. arXiv:1212.6182. Bibcode:2013AJ....145...44Z. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/145/2/44. Vizier catalog entry
  3. ^ a b c d e f Johns-Krull, Christopher M. et al. (2008). "XO-3b: A Massive Planet in an Eccentric Orbit Transiting an F5V Star". The Astrophysical Journal 677 (1): 657–670. arXiv:0712.4283. Bibcode:2008ApJ...677..657J. doi:10.1086/528950. 
  4. ^ a b c Cutri et al. (2003). "2MASS===04215269+5749018". 2MASS All-Sky Catalog of Point Sources. Retrieved 2012-02-25. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Winn, Joshua N. et al. (2008). "The Transit Light Curve Project. IX. Evidence for a Smaller Radius of the Exoplanet XO-3b". The Astrophysical Journal 683 (2): 1076–1084. arXiv:0804.4475. Bibcode:2008ApJ...683.1076W. doi:10.1086/589737. 
  6. ^ "SIMBAD query result: TYC 3727-1064-1 -- Star". Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2012-02-25. 
  7. ^ Adams, E. R. et al. (2013). "Adaptive Optics Images. II. 12 Kepler Objects of Interest and 15 Confirmed Transiting Planets". The Astronomical Journal 146 (1). 9. arXiv:1305.6548. Bibcode:2013AJ....146....9A. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/146/1/9. 
  8. ^ Winn, Joshua N. et al. (2009). "On the Spin-Orbit Misalignment of the XO-3 Exoplanetary System". The Astrophysical Journal 700 (1): 302–308. arXiv:0902.3461. Bibcode:2009ApJ...700..302W. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/700/1/302. 
  9. ^ Hirano, Teruyuki et al. (2011). "Further Observations of the Tilted Planet XO-3: A New Determination of Spin-Orbit Misalignment, and Limits on Differential Rotation". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 63 (6): L57–L61. arXiv:1108.4493. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63L..57H. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.6.l57. 

External links[edit]

  • "XO-3". Exoplanets. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 

Coordinates: Sky map 04h 21m 52.7048s, +57° 49′ 01.886″