XO-4

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XO-4
Observation data
Epoch 2000      Equinox 2000
Constellation Lynx[1]
Right ascension 07h 21m 33.159s[2]
Declination +58° 16′ 04.98″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) 10.674 ± 0.019[3]
Characteristics
Spectral type F5V[3]
Apparent magnitude (B) 11.240 ± 0.029[3]
Apparent magnitude (V) 10.674 ± 0.019[3]
Apparent magnitude (J) 9.667 ± 0.021[4]
Apparent magnitude (H) 9.476 ± 0.022[4]
Apparent magnitude (K) 9.406 ± 0.023[4]
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: -18.1 ± 2.9[2] mas/yr
Dec.: -4.0 ± 2.9[2] mas/yr
Distance 956 ± 62[3] ly
(293 ± 19[3] pc)
Details
Mass 1.32 ± 0.02[3] M
Radius 1.56 ± 0.05[3] R
Temperature 6397 ± 70[3] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] -0.04 ± 0.03[3] dex
Age 2.1 ± 0.6[3] Gyr
Other designations
TYC 3793-1994-1, GSC 03793-01994, 2MASS J07213317+5816051[5]

XO-4 is a star located approximately 960 light-years away from Earth in the Lynx constellation. It has a magnitude of about 11 and cannot be seen with the naked eye but is visible through a small telescope.[3] A search for a binary companion star using adaptive optics at the MMT Observatory was negative.[6]

Planetary system[edit]

One known exoplanet, XO-4b, which is classified as a hot jupiter, orbits XO-4. This exoplanet was discovered in 2008 by the XO Telescope project using the transit method.[3]

The XO-4 system[3][7][8]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
XO-4b 1.72 ± 0.20 MJ 0.0552 ± 0.0003 4.1250823 ± 0.0000039 0(assumed) [note 1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ eccentricity approximately equal to zero is expected theoretically and is consistent with the radial velocities and secondary eclipses timing[3][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roman (1987). "Constellation boundaries". Identification of a Constellation From Position. Retrieved 2012-01-05. 
  2. ^ a b c d Hog et al. (2000). "Tyc 3793-1994-1". The Tycho-2 Catalogue. Retrieved 2012-02-25. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o McCullough, P. R. et al. (2008). XO-4b: An Extrasolar Planet Transiting an F5V Star. arXiv:0805.2921. Bibcode:2008arXiv0805.2921M. 
  4. ^ a b c Cutri et al. (2003). "2MASS===07213317+5816051". 2MASS All-Sky Catalog of Point Sources. Retrieved 2012-02-25. 
  5. ^ "SIMBAD query result: TYC 3793-1994-1 -- Star". Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2009-04-26. 
  6. ^ Adams, E. R. et al. (2013). "Adaptive Optics Images. II. 12 Kepler Objects of Interest and 15 Confirmed Transiting Planets". The Astronomical Journal 146 (1). 9. arXiv:1305.6548. Bibcode:2013AJ....146....9A. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/146/1/9. 
  7. ^ Narita, Norio et al. (2010). "The Rossiter-McLaughlin Effect of the Transiting Exoplanet XO-4b". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 62 (6): L61–L65. arXiv:1008.3803. Bibcode:2010PASJ...62L..61N. 
  8. ^ a b Todorov, Kamen O. et al. (2012). "Warm Spitzer Observations of Three Hot Exoplanets: XO-4b, HAT-P-6b, and HAT-P-8b". The Astrophysical Journal 746 (1). article number 111. arXiv:1111.5858. Bibcode:2012ApJ...746..111T. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/746/1/111. 

External links[edit]

  • "XO-4". Exoplanets. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 

Coordinates: Sky map 07h 21m 33.1657s, +58° 16′ 05.005″